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The Run For The Roses

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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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    Posted: 03 May 2013 at 09:20
All this talk about Cinco d’Mayo on the other forums leaves me cold. The real importance of this weekend is the Kentucky Derby, which runs tomorrow.

I’ll be celebrating with pulled pork made in the Kentucky manner.
It’s kind of strange. When the discussion turns to barbecue it’s as if Kentucky doesn’t exist. We talk about Memphis style, and eastern North Carolina style, and St. Louis style. There’s the yellow sauces of South Carolina, and the heavily rubbed and sauced Texas style. Most barbecuers aren’t even aware that Kentucky has its own approach.

The secret of Kentucky Cue is simplicity. A mopping sauce is made with equal parts of Worcestershire and apple cider vinegar. This is both injected into the pork butt and used as a mopping sauce as the meat cooks low and slow.

The final saucing also is light and simple. Mix two parts Worcestershire to one part apple cider vinegar. To that add some tomato paste, brown sugar, allspice, and paprika. That’s all she wrote. This sauce is brushed onto the meat the last part of cooking.

While barbecue is certainly part of every Kentucky Derby celebration it’s not iconic. For that we turn to Burgoo (a stew similar in origination to Brunswick Stew) and, of course, mint juleps. Personally, I don’t care for either of them, so will pass. But I’ll likely make my mini-Kentucky Hot Browns as a starter.

Anyone else celebrating the Run for The Roses?

But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2013 at 10:04
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

All this talk about Cinco d’Mayo on the other forums leaves me cold. The real importance of this weekend is the Kentucky Derby, which runs tomorrow.

I’ll be celebrating with pulled pork made in the Kentucky manner.





   LOL, that opening line had me laughing...of course it should be about Kentucky!


   I'll make my next shoulder in the Kentucky Style!  thanks for sharing!  (and no, I wasn't aware of the Kentucky styled pulled pork...but I am now!)


  thanks!
  Dan
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2013 at 10:33
and no, I wasn't aware of the Kentucky styled pulled pork

You're certainly not alone in that, Dan. Even many Kentuckians are unaware that they have their own style, as it's mostly endemic to the western part of the state. BBQ joints here in central Kentucky, for instance, mostly make Memphis style.

One other aspect of Kentucky Cue is the heavy use of mutton. At one time Kentucky was the #1 sheep producing state in the country, and mutton remains popular, especially among old timers.

I don't care for mutton, myself. But maybe it's an acquired taste.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2013 at 12:10
Sounds lovely Brook. Have a wonderful Kentucky Derby weekend ... and of course, your pulled pork roast sounds delicious too ...
 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2013 at 12:44
great idea, brook ~
i remember that you posted several recipes relating to the kentucky derby ~ can you link them all here?
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2013 at 13:21
Sure thing, Ron. You can find them here: http://www.foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/the-run-for-the-roses_topic2153_page1.html?KW=Kentucky+Derby
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2013 at 13:26
Thanks!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 April 2015 at 07:22
Just bumping this for anyone thinking about a Derby Day party.

Another interesting Kentucky speciality often part of Derby Day is Benedictine spread. Not a traditional dish in terms of antiquity, it was first served by Louisville caterer Jennie Benedict, back in 1920:

Benedictine Spread

12 oz cream cheese at room temperature
1 med cucumber, grated pulp, drained
1 med onion, finely grated, drained with some juice reserved
1 tsp salt
Pinch cayenne or glug Tabasco
Mayonnaise to thin as necessary
Drop of green food coloring

Blend all ingredients until spreadable consistency. If making by hand, mash and beat the cheese with a fork, working in the cucumber and onion. Add onion juice to taste. Beat in remaining ingredients, adding only enough mayonnaise to thin. Place in crocks. Serve chilled on crackers or as a sandwich filling.
But we hae meat and we can eat
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 April 2015 at 07:54
   I'll be doing the Kentucky Style Pulled Pork again this year :)

   I'll see if I can remember to get a picture.

  thanks for the bump
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drinks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 April 2015 at 15:40
Ohh, all the nasty things people do to meat.
REAL Texas style involves some black pepper, a bit of ground cayenne a touch of salt and a bit of neutral cooking oil, happen to prefer canola, but others work too, in a base of beer.
slow over low heat until it tries fall apart.
No, brisket is NOT the best choice, loin or sirloin is much better , the brisket fad may well be on the way out as the price of brisket is approaching and even exceeding the price of loin and sirloin.
The only reason people started using it was it used to be VERY cheap.
Flank and skirt are also going nuts on price, I recall being given a piece or two of those by the butcher in the '50s and '60s when I bought a steak or roast and having no idea what to do with it.
Usually either baked it or gave it to the dog.
I think the best is "al pastor" that is, campfire style as is done in Mexico.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 April 2015 at 12:46
Originally posted by drinks drinks wrote:

Ohh, all the nasty things people do to meat.
REAL Texas style involves some black pepper, a bit of ground cayenne a touch of salt and a bit of neutral cooking oil, happen to prefer canola, but others work too, in a base of beer.
slow over low heat until it tries fall apart.
No, brisket is NOT the best choice, loin or sirloin is much better , the brisket fad may well be on the way out as the price of brisket is approaching and even exceeding the price of loin and sirloin.
The only reason people started using it was it used to be VERY cheap.
Flank and skirt are also going nuts on price, I recall being given a piece or two of those by the butcher in the '50s and '60s when I bought a steak or roast and having no idea what to do with it.
Usually either baked it or gave it to the dog.
I think the best is "al pastor" that is, campfire style as is done in Mexico.
 

  Drinks, did you mean to post this under Brook's Kentucky Style Pulled Pork Recipe?

  al pastor, in Chicago area, is known to be marinated pork.  It's quite good...though it's interesting to read about regional differences.

  take care,
 Dan
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 May 2015 at 21:09
Originally posted by Brook Brook wrote:

The secret of Kentucky Cue is simplicity. A mopping sauce is made with equal parts of Worcestershire and apple cider vinegar. This is both injected into the pork butt and used as a mopping sauce as the meat cooks low and slow. 

The final saucing also is light and simple. Mix two parts Worcestershire to one part apple cider vinegar. To that add some tomato paste, brown sugar, allspice, and paprika. That’s all she wrote. This sauce is brushed onto the meat the last part of cooking. 

Except for injecting, this is happening tomorrow, as I give my MES 30 a proper shake-down!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drinks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 May 2015 at 22:16
Al ,Pastor,( in the manner of the shepherd) is about the most simple way to cook meat, a support is made from , usually rebar, in the form of a double T, one crossbar at the top of an upright and another.
about 1/2 way down.
Usually, a very young goat is placed on the support , spread out.
The support is placed in a bed of coals in an upright position, the animal is rubbed down with some salt, black pepper and if you like, a bit of ground cayenne.
An occasional wipe of a fat is done on the meat and it is left until done.
A very common method in Mexico and the Southwestern U.S.
Any piece of meat can be done that way.
There is a large Cabrito al Pastor cafe on the square at Reynosa ,MX.
The store front, about 100m, is a bed of mesquite coals behind a glass front.
You just tell the waiter what piece you want and how well cooked .
Requires a reasonable amount of cold cerveza and it comes with a stack of fresh tortillas.
That is really basic cooking.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2015 at 10:55
   Hi Drinks!

   No doubt that there are regional differences in the words used to describe various cooking methods, dishes, etc.  In the upper Midwest, I know al pastor as being a marinated pork...truly delicious!  

   Cooking in the tradition you described, Double T with animal spread out, etc...I know as al asador.  I've seen this method used with a brine being splashed on the meat as it's being cooked by the open flame.  This is a method I'm looking forward to using in the future.

   Have a great weekend!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drinks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2015 at 11:59
I have to warn you, the method I described can be habit forming!
:<)
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