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Ti-Malice

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    Posted: 18 December 2010 at 14:04

Ti-Malice is a Haitian hot condiment used to spoon over food, such as beans and rice, pork, and vegetable sides. It is a staple condiment in Haiti, and adds a fiery zest to a plate of food....sounds tasty!

In Haitian folklore, Ti-Malice is the smart but mischevious trickster, often paired with Uncle Bouki, not the brightest of sorts and on the recieving end of Ti-Malice's tricks, jokes and pranks.
 
This recipe comes from the series Culinaria, and volume The Caribbean. As I like to do during the cold dreary times of the winter, a Caribbean recipe or two really brightens up the day, a meal and the season. Nothing better than to get some "island excitement" going on.
 
Last year I went Jamaican with Red Beans And Rice paired up with their delicious Meat Patties. Today, it's Haitian Ti-Malice condiment; I'll put that on something else Caribbean I'll make some other time- for now, this is a very nice way to take advantage of my Bhut Jolokia hot peppers.
 
Not a lot to the recipe, here's the goods. The recipe in the book called for chives, but this time of year they are few and very far between around here, so a perfectly good substitute is the green part of spring onions (there's also garlic which I forgot to put in the pic):
 
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Finely chop the onions-

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Finely chopped the green oniony part only-

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Added 1 cup lime juice (took 6 limes)-

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Mixed all that well and set out on the counter to marinate at room temp for 2 hours.

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There's not any extra juice sitting in the bottom of the  bowl, it has all been incorporated on the onions. No worries it smells great! Meanwhile, I'll de-seed a couple bhut jolokias since I didn't have any habaneros or scotch bonnets, as the mixture should have, being common in Haiti.
 
Here's the recipe from the book (I'm doubling it today as I make it)
 
1 large onion finely chopped
1/2 cup chives, finely chopped
1/2 cup lime juice
3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1/4 cup olive oil
2 teaspoons finely chopped hot peppers
salt and pepper 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 December 2010 at 16:25
After two hours of marinating, there was a good deal of juice collected at the bottom of the bowl; very nice and smelled bright and fresh. Stirred it up once again and then added the 3 bhut jolokias I chopped up. First I split them in half, then de-seeded them under running cold water as well as taking out the ribs. Wow, they sure gave off some potent vapors of chili-heat! The red one's sure are a world different from when they are green.

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Added a good dollop of pre-minced garlic, then a scant tablespoon each of table salt and fresh ground black pepper, and finally, a half cup or so of olive oil...

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Scrubbed and sanitized six half-pint jars for the canning process. Filled them with the Ti-Malice then put them into the boiling water bath. The canning blue-book calls for 10 minutes water bath, so the clock began once they were in a rolling boil-

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More pictures later as well as a taste description.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 December 2010 at 17:17
Looks great, John!  Great background and pics, too!Clap
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 December 2010 at 18:09
Hey Andy, thanks! It was interesting to learn about Ti-Malice when I poked aorund the web looking for any background on the sauce. Apparently there are some versions that use tomatoes in the ingredients, but it looks like the original Ti-Malice is a plain-and-potent clear sauce as the one I found and made.
 
The folklore part was interesting- just about every peoples have a "tricktster" tale and story-line. We have B'rer Rabbit and B'rer Bear, The Inca's had their Fox, but no dim-witted foil, as did the Scandinavians with Loki, the Africans with Ananse...all great folklore. Dim counterparts are not necessary for the story-line to transcend humanity. Many tricksters outwitted their Gods!
 
After 12 minutes of rolling water bath out came the jars of Ti-Malice!
 
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Looking nice and demure....hiding that secret potency I just know resides within! The pieces of hot peppers contrasted nicely with the cooking onions-
 
The recipe is designed for this to be eaten fresh; that is, after all mixed together, put into a saucepan, brought to a boil, then immediately removed and allowed to cool. At that point the book says it is ready and will keep 7 days in the fridge.
 
I wanted to can this so I could share it. The hot water bath boiling action is equivalent to the saucepan boiling, so I think we will get the same result with a shelf-stable package. Once opened, between the acids, the salt and the oil, I am certain it will keep far, far, more than 7 days in the fridge! I have a hard time imagining anything growing in this combination of ingredients~ high acid, salt and an oil environment.
 
Anyway, once the jars cool down, I will pop one open and post results, unless I spontaneously combust in the tasting! Big smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 December 2010 at 18:54

hey, john - that looks really good, and fresh. i can just imagine that the lime, onions and garlic really make this one sing - not to mention the bhut jolokias! as usual, it is always interesting to see the complex goodness that comes from just a few simple ingredients. looking forward to hearing about the results of the taste test!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 December 2010 at 19:33
John,

I know the recipe calls for it to be eaten fresh but I have found that salsas and sauces actually benefit from the canning process.  The Haitians probably claim it should be eaten fresh because they don't have a canner.  It will be fantastic!

Also, ghost chilies look awesome.  Woe to he who bites into one!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 December 2010 at 20:40
Hey you two, both of you all are correct. The mix of basic flavors is unbelievably good as was the canning/cooking process making it better!
 
After the jars had cooled down and supper was heating, I tossed in a couple corn tortillas into the oven to warm.
 
I did not know what to expect with this Ti-Malice, and thinking it would be unbelievably fiery~ thought a bit of toning down with warm corn-tortilla-dough in the mouth might help.
 
No need for that worry at all! The cooking / canning process, as Andy pointed out, did wonders for this sauce. Raw, without cooking may have been a whole different story; but as the recipe called for, a bit of cooking was in order and the canning did it. Once the jar was opened, you can see that the onion was partially cooked, but a bit of crispness is still left inside. This is the same for all ingredients within, and the partial cooking softened and melded all the sharpness of the onions and hot pepper into a nice flow.
 
 
I was not sure how hot all this would be so I put about a hearty teaspoon on a warm tortilla, making sure to get red peppers in it. If I was going to die, I wanted to die properly and facing the heat head-on!

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Rolled the baby up and started to munch. First bite or two got a wonderful warm flavour of olive oil, bright-but-subdued onion, some onion greenery form the spring onion stalks, and definitely a delicious undercurrent of lime. Had I not gotten pepper? Another bite; gentle chewing....ahh, there it was...that warm soft glow in the background, slowly coming up, slowly rising, just as I had felt in my first tasting of bhut jolokia in my other post here . The heat was warm, soft and comforting, a lot like the false dawn when you're camping, and its been a cold night and you can feel the sun's rays but it has not broken the horizon yet....that's what the heat was like, gentle, yet there. The pepper tasted slightly smokey, slightly deep and red as opposed to the vibrant green when the plant is unripe. As the glow of the heat came closer, I imagined the dawn's sun just breaking the horizon, just starting to fill the sky, and that's what the heat was like...just coming up, just starting to fill my head.
 
Nothing explosive, nor fiery, nor alarming....just a slow steady gentle heat that was mesmerizing as it was overpowering. It was delicious, like sinking into a very hot bath. This pepper is good.
 
I never broke out into a sweat, I never had to breathe-in heavily to cool my tongue. Nothing of the fire-alarm common chiles. This is a sophisticated, subdued chili....it just comes on over and curls around you. The heat is good, strong, yet manageable.
 
After that Ti-Malice taco, I had to try another one. This time triple the sauce, but just-in-case....a slice of American cheese to tone the heat- completely unnecessary as the heat and the sauce was perfect no matter the amount.
 
In all, this is without a doubt, one of the best salsas I have ever made; the balance, the combination of flavors, the ability of so many folks to enjoy it as opposed to some other fiery demonic sauces only us few could ever be able to consume! This one, Ti-Malice, is a good one, a decent one, and certainly a wonderful condiment to add to food, especially Caribbean fare.
 
I am really looking forward to sharing this with my fellow chili-head Boilermaker and hear his opinion!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 December 2010 at 22:41
Looking forward to this one.  I have some culinary plans for it in the making!Clap
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 December 2010 at 05:07
John ...if you were to compare this salsa with your habanero -mango salsa...strictly on a heat level, what would you say?
If your mango salsa was a 5 on a scale of one to ten, with one being lowest heat and ten being highest...where would you rate the heat of the Ti-Malice?
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 December 2010 at 15:28
Originally posted by Hoser Hoser wrote:

John ...if you were to compare this salsa with your habanero -mango salsa...strictly on a heat level, what would you say?
If your mango salsa was a 5 on a scale of one to ten, with one being lowest heat and ten being highest...where would you rate the heat of the Ti-Malice?
 
Wow, you're generous Dave, I would have rated that mango habanero salsa more like a 7 or 8! It was hot! The Ti-Malice is definitely a 2. The heat is even, measurable and controlled in the sense that it doesn't explode in your mouth like a firecracker, nor come in a huge wave all at once. It is gentle and warm, that's all. I do think that if I'd used the habaneros or tabasco's from my plants this year (all grown and ripened outdoors in the summer) the sauce would have been a lot hotter. The Jolokia has been ripening indoors, so that may have figured prominently in the toning down of the heat.
 
If you'd like, I will send you a jar of the habanero and one of Ti-Malice so you can compare and taste what I mean. The Ti-Malice is nice! I can definitely envision this topping some jerk barbecued chicken or roast pork.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 December 2010 at 03:17
I still have one jar of the habanero Rivet...I've been hanging on to it for a special occasion.
I'm really looking forward to trying this new one.
Go ahead...play with your food!
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