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French Onion Soup

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Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
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    Posted: 12 October 2018 at 16:35
Ron, 

It is a quick versión however, the consommé  is  from beef stock and the rest are basically natural ingredients and eco or bio flour .. I use an italian flour from Italy which I get from an Italian friend here.

I also use a group of mixed onions:  Cebolletas, which are on a long thick Green stem similar to a leek, and have dangling " White onions " ( 2 or 3 ! ) .. And the bio yellow golden exterior  variety ..  

I shall post the other more traditional one over the weekend ..

I really like Chris´s ..  

Something easy to prepare too ..  

Have a lovely wkend .. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 October 2018 at 11:29
That certainly looks good ~
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 October 2018 at 09:23

Here is one of the récipes from my French Mom ..

30 grams of French 82% butter 
1 kilo of onions sliced finely into arcs
1 / 2 tablesp.  Golden sugar 
4 tableps.  of flour all purpose 
125 ml.  Cognac 
Evoo ( French or Italian ) 
2 tiny cloves of garlic 
1 French style  baguette 
100 grams of  French Guyère 
A few shot glasses of dry White French or similar wine (White Burgundy, Riesling or Rueda Verdejo )

Heat the butter and the Evoo in a large Dutch Oven type pot ..

Using a spatula ( wooden ) turn in one direction frequently  until the  onions are a light pale Golden color but do not over do it .. 

Add slowly the cognac, the White wine and some wáter or a beef consomme ..  

Now let it low simmer ..  and cover partially .. Approx 20 to 30 minutes .. Season to taste with S & P.

Toast your bread canapés with Evoo and garlic (rub the garlic into the slices of bread ) and drizzle a Little Evoo on them ..  Put under oven  broiler or grill until slightly Golden ..

Now add the cheese and melt it on the bread ..

This shall go into the finished onion soup .. 

I have 1 more récipe which is quite a bit more classic from maternal grandmom but more complicated.  Shall type it tomorrow ..



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 October 2018 at 15:53
I hope you are able to find it - sounds good!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 October 2018 at 15:43


I have made it on rare occasion, and I do agree with Chris on the White Wine and on the  French  Gruyere ..   And the preparation techniques he suggests ..  

I shall look tomorrow for my mom´s recipe  however, being my mom was  French, I believe it was very close to Chris´s recipe ..  

 
It is a lovely autumn or winter warm up ..
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 October 2018 at 09:05
I took a quick look, and that was pretty impressive! Truly some amazing colour in there, with the soup itself.

There are at least a couple of ideas in there that I would like to incorporate the next time I make this soup.

Thanks for sharing!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 October 2018 at 08:47
Chef Bruno Albouze offers 4 options with his recipe for French Onion Soup and a different take on Demi Glace.  Interesting and informative.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 October 2018 at 16:25
Adding to the collective knowlege on the subject, here is a recipe for French Onion Soup from Time/Life’s Foods of the World - The Cooking of Provincial France (1968):

Quote Soupe a l'Oignon
French Onion Soup

To serve 6 to 8:

For the soup:

4 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 pounds onions, thinly sliced (about 7 cups)
1 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons flour
2 quarts beef stock, fresh or canned, or beef and chicken stock combined

For the Croutes:

12 to 16 one-inch-thick slices of French bread
2 teaspoons olive oil
1 garlic clove, cut
1 cup grated, imported Swiss cheese or Swiss and freshly grated Parmesan cheese combined

In a heavy 4- to 5-quart saucepan or a soup kettle, melt the butter with the oil over moderate heat. Stir in the onions and 1 teaspoon salt, and cook uncovered over low heat, stirring occasionally, for 20 to 30 minutes, or until the onions are a rich golden brown. Sprinkle flour over the onions and cook, stirring, for 2 or 3 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat.

In a separate saucepan, bring the stock to a simmer, then stir the hot stock into the onions. Return the soup to low heat and simmer, partially covered, for another 30 or 40 minutes, occasionally skimming off the fat. Taste for seasoning, and add salt and pepper if needed.

While the soup simmers, make the croutes. Preheat the oven to 325°F. Spread the slices of bread in one layer on a baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes. With a pastry brush, lightly coat both sides of each slice with olive oil. Then turn the slices over and bake for another 15 minutes, or until the bread is completely dry and lightly browned. Rub each slice with the cut garlic clove and set aside.

To serve,place the croutes in a large tureen or individual soup bowls and ladle the soup over them. Pass the grated cheese separately.

ALTERNATIVE: To make onion soup gratinée, preheat the oven to 375°F. Ladle the soup into an ovenproof tureen or individual soup bowls, top with croutes, and spread the grated cheese on top. Sprinkle the cheese with a little melted butter or olive oil. Bake for 10 to 20 minutes, or until the cheese has melted, then slide the soup under a hot broiler for a minute or two to brown the top if desired.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 January 2016 at 18:55
Hi, eranils - please forgive my tardy response - I have been far too busy with work, family and other adventures.

Thank you for the information regarding the wine, which makes perfect sense. I also like your idea with the pork bones, and will be sure to try it the next time I make it. 

Thank you again for sharing your experiences; this soup is possibly my favourite of them all, and I am always eager to learn of ways to make it better.

Best of the new year to you -

Ron
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote eranils31 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 November 2015 at 16:14
Hello TasunkaWitko,
 
Your recipe is great  and all the comments I've read are right in the sense  the onions have to be simmered very , very  slowly in order they get "jamlike" ans equally brown ans soft.
 
Concerning the wine , in Paris  region (where this soup comes from at the beginning), they use a dry white wine (like Muscadet or Gros Plant) to balance the sweetness  of the onions. Traditionnaly, they just pour basic wines for cooking.
 
Personnaly , to add  flavours , my family traditionnaly add two or three pork bones (no meat on) at the very beginning while the onions are simmering to add extra taste .The caramelized bones really make a diiference . Try it and tell me about it.
 
There is no real right recipe in fact. This is the intersting point....
please suscribe at http://so-easycooking.blogspot.com and learn the famous chefs techniques
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 January 2014 at 21:58
Well, my learning and growing with this soup continued today, as The Beautiful Mrs. Tas requested this for supper tonight. I decided to try a couple-three little tweaks in my effort to improve, and I think I did pretty well.

For one thing, I was able to start early and cook down the onions longer than ever before, using my enameled cast iron Dutch oven and a little butter and olive oil combined. carefully managing the heat on the stovetop, I was able to cook them down for my self-imposed goal of a minimum of three hours, slowly transforming them to a nice, rich, toasty golden-brown; it was a long, arduous process, and my onions nearly disappeared, but it was worth it to get such beautiful caramelisation.

I then added the flour and allowed it to work with the residual butter and oil to form a nice, rich roux for another 30 minutes or so before adding the minced garlic and some black pepper (I added no sugar to the soup at all, and figured that the stock itself would contain enough salt). I then de-glased with white wine and added the stock.

For the wine, I used pinot grigio; I have no idea if this is a "good" wine to use with French onion soup or not, but it seemed to me as if it added a bit of acidity and maybe a little bitterness as well, which seemed to balance well with the sweetness from the caramelised onions and the salt in the stock. Where the stock is concerned, I had previously been using a 50/50 blend of chicken and beef, but the result wasn't quite right and the colour seemed a little to light, so I went with 2 parts beef to 1 part chicken, and found this to be a great improvement in terms of flavour and colour.

After adding the stock, I took a page from Julia Child, adding grated raw onion and bay leaf to the soup. I let the soup simmer for half an hour while I drizzled the 1/2-inch-thick slices of French bread with a little olive oil and toasted them under the broiler for a minute or two on each side. Each slice took up the space of half the diametre of the bowls I was using, so I planned for two croutons per bowl (side-by-side) in order to cover the surface of the soup.

When the soup was ready for serving, I ladled some into an earthenware bowl, added my toasted croutons and placed a thin slice of Swiss cheese on top. I then sprinkled a small amount of a shredded cheese blend (consisting of half sharp Cheddar and half "six-cheese Italian blend") - just enough to barely cover the Swiss. After a few short minutes under the broiler, the cheeses bubbled and toasted to near-perfection, and I served the soup.

Results were very good, and I believe that the new things I tried succeeded quite well. I'll be integrating these concepts into future preparations and would welcome input and suggestions, particularly regarding the wine. I wasn't sure if it would be a good choice, especially as tasted a little too "floral" for my tastes on its own; but it was the only white wine that I had, so I tried it and was satisfied that it worked reasonably well.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 August 2012 at 18:20
Happy 100th birthday Julia.

Here's her Onion Soup recipe:

Originally posted by Julia Julia wrote:

French Onion Soup

5 -6 cups yellow onions, thinly sliced (about 1 1/2 to 2 lbs)
1 tablespoon cooking oil
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons flour
6 cups beef stock (preferably homemade)
1 cup wine (dry red or white)
1 bay leaf
1/2 teaspoon ground sage
salt and pepper
12 ounces swiss cheese, grated
4 ounces parmesan cheese, grated
1/2 raw yellow onion
2 to 3 tablespoons cognac
8 slices French bread (about 1 inch thick)
4 tablespoons olive oil, for drizzling


Directions:

1 Place heavy bottom stock pot or dutch over over medium-low heat.

2 Add 1 Tbs cooking oil, 2Tbs butter to pot.

3 Add sliced onions and stir until they are evenly coated with the oil.

4 Cover and cook for about 20 minutes until they are very tender and translucent.

5 To brown or caramelize the onions turn heat under pot to medium or medium high heat.

6 Add 1/2 tsp sugar and 1 tsp salt and continue to cook uncovered, stirring frequently until the onions have browned and reduced significantly.

7 Once caramelized, reduce heat to medium-low and add 3 Tbs flour to the onions.

8 Brown the flour for about 2-3 minutes trying not to scorch it. (If the flour does not form a thick paste, you can add a bit more butter here).

9 Stir in about 1 cup of warm stock, scraping the bottom of the pan to get up all of the cooked-on bits.

10 Add the rest of the stock, wine, sage, and bay leaf to the soup.

11 Simmer for 30 minutes.

12 To make the "croutes" (toasted bread), heat oven to 325 degrees F.

13 Drizzle each side of the bread slices with a bit of olive oil and place on baking sheet.

14 Cook the croutes for 15 minutes in oven on each side (30 minutes total).

15 Check the soup for seasoning and add salt and pepper if needed.

16 Remove the bay leaf (if you can find it).

17 Transfer to a casserole dish.

18 At this point you can add the 2-3 Tbs cognac and grate the 1/2 raw onion into the soup.

19 Add a few ounces of the swiss cheese directly into the soup and stir.

20 Place the toasted bread in a single layer on top of the soup.

21 Sprinkle the rest of the cheese in a thick layer on top of the bread making sure to cover the edges of the toast to prevent burning.

22 Drizzle with a little oil or melted butter.

23 Place in a 350 degree oven for about 30 minutes.

24 Turn on broiler and brown cheese well.

25 Let cool for a few minutes.

26 Bon Apetit!

Read more at: http://www.food.com/recipe/authentic-french-onion-soup-courtesy-of-julia-child-356428


This recipe in my not so humble opinion is the ultimate Onion Soup recipe. Anything else, heck just buy a can of Campbell's Onion Soup!

This is simply the standard of French Onion Soup bar none.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 July 2012 at 11:06
daikon - i do own a pressure cooker, although i've only used it once and not quite for its intended purpose (to can some deer chunks) since it is a pressure cooker and not a canner. one thing i learned is that one wants to use distilled or other "pure" water, not chinook, montana water, in order to eliminate a build-up of a white mineral powder that deposits on the cookware.

at first, a pressure cooker seems intimidating, but in all honesty, it really isn't as hard to use as i feared it would be. i'm commited to trying this recipe again with some of the modifications mentioned above, and that would be a good time to give modernist cuisine's method a go, as well.

But, for now: at the request of the beautiful mrs. tas, i made this again for supper yesterday, using some suggestions from the posts above:

i used white wine (chardonnay), rather than the merlot that we had used in the past.

i used yellow onions, rather than white.

i omitted the sugar.

i had no swiss cheese, so i blended sharp cheddar with the usual italian blend that i buy (parmesan, romano, mozzarella, provolone and asiago).

normally, i cut the croutons very thick; this time, i cut them thinner, no more than half an inch.

results were very good, and i was impressed. the yellow onions provided a lot of sweetness, making the addition of sugar unnecessary. i started the project earlier than usual, so i was able to give them a long, slow cooking (about 2.5 hours); not as thorough as keller's, but definitely better than i've been able to do in the past. the enameled cast iron dutch oven really paid for itself yesterday - using modest, well-monitored temperatures, the onions, which at first completely filled the pot, reduced down dramatically and took on a very nice, toasted, golden brown colour, with an incredible "roasted" aroma that comes from good carmelisation. i am sure that if i would have had another hour, they really would have been just about perfect - but these were very good.

the white wine was also a very good switch, bringing a unique depth that i hadn't noticed before and a rich flavour that i was very glad to have experienced. i had wanted to use sauvignon blanc, but in my little one-horse town, they only had one bottle, and it was an expensive label, so i went with a more frugal chardonnay. i considered riesling, but figured i was already making enough changes for one day, and wasn't sure how it would work - too many tweaks make it hard to evaluate. in all, i can't decide if i prefer the white wine over the red - i really enjoy them both equally, from different perspectives. i had no stock available, so i used a half-beef, half-chicken broth and did not add any additional salt. this worked well, giving the best of both flavours, i think.

in the past, i had been rather haphazard about the croutons and cheese, but this time, i tried a few changes. following keller's lead, i cut them thinner than usual, allowed them to get "stale" for a few hours, and toasted them under the broiler just to the point of reaching a rich, dark gold. i also made sure that the croutons covered the soup, placing them so that they would catch the cheese and not let any down into the soup. as for the cheese, i used less of it than i have used in the past, trying to mimic keller's effect of a thin slice crusting the soup, rather than ending up with the big, gooey mess i had in the past, which i personally enjoyed, but it certainly wasn't refined. the cheddar, toasted with the other cheeses on the croutons, was very very nice as well, adding beautiful colour and just a bit of bite to the whole, for some nice balance.

my only concern is that the soup seemed quite a bit lighter than usual. this is probably due to the white wine, and also possibly in some part to the half-chicken/half-beef broth, but flavour certainly didn't suffer.

all-in-all, these changes all worked very well, and i was impressed enough to keep them for use in the future. i may use red or white wine, depending on whim or what i have at the moment, but the other, more fundamental changes speak to technique, and i do believe that my technique improved after yesterday. my thanks to daikon and chris (and also to keller, in absentia) for their input, which has allowed me to grow. 

future goals for my french onion soup method include moving a little more toward keller's method, including homemade beef stock, large, thin slices of cheese rather than shredded, and attempting a longer, slower onion cook. once i have these down, i'd like to try the pressure cooker method for comparison.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 May 2012 at 15:10
Originally posted by TasunkaWitko TasunkaWitko wrote:

due to the fact that the beautiful mrs. tas has a work schedule requiring her to get up very early in the morning (she is a registered long-term care nurse), and she was scheduled to work this weekend - my late start on the soup ran up against her bedtime, and it was necessary to rush the finishing of the soup before the onions could really develop. the resulting soup was still really good-tasting, but the colours were way off (kind of a whitish pink or pinkish white) and the flavours were quite unfinished. lesson learned: i will start at least an hour (maybe two) earlier next time!


Do you own a pressure cooker?  I'm actually pretty confident that the method I mentioned above from Modernist Cuisine would work to dramatically reduce the length of time it takes to fully caramelize the onions.  It would take a little experimenting to figure out exactly how much time is required to produce the best results, but the caramelized carrot soup recipe should provide a good initial estimate -- i.e., about 20 minutes to caramelize a pound of onions in the pressure cooker at 15 psig.

After some looking, I also found this information on caramelizing onions in a pressure cooker:

http://egullet.org/p1824936

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 May 2012 at 11:20
well, i am definitely inspired now, after reading your post with  the suggestions and the recipe. i must admit that the idea of water is shocking, but as you said, to feature the onions, it does make sense.
 
your wine suggestions make good sense - i was pretty sure i would be steering away from the sweet white wines, and figured that chardonnay or sauvignon blanc would work best. the cheddar cheese idea is something that i never would have thought of on my own, but as you say ~ its qualities might really turn out to be something - say a slice of sharp cheddar with a slice of swiss....
 
i'm going to see about incorporating your suggestions (wine, cheddar cheese etc) into the recipe from the original post, along with ideas from keller and perhaps this recipe quoted above. i'm thinking that taking some of the best ideas from all might result in something extraordinary!
 
officially inspired, and planning on this for the near future ~ of course, another cool, dreary grey day would be perfect....
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ChrisFlanders Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 May 2012 at 11:05

A little extra information was much nearer over here than I thought, Ron. Last year I bought the extra edition of the french magazine "Cuisine Actuelle" that is made around "105 recettes et astuces de grand-mère", translated as "105 recipes and clever tricks from grand-mother". There's a recipe for french onion soup and I have to say granny's methods surprised me, look what they use as a liquid! I translate it, you never know if people wanted to try that recipe out, I certainly will;

Source; "Cuisine Actuelle - Hors série - sept./oct. 2011 - 105 recettes et astuces de grand-mère"

Ingredients for 4 persons; 400 grams white onions, 1 clove of garlic, 120 grams of grated Emmental, 40 grams butter, 1 tbsp flour, 100 ml dry white wine, 1 bouquet garni, 12 slices of grilled baguette, salt and freshly ground black pepper

- peel and chop the onions. Peel and very finely chop the garlic.

- melt the butter in a large pot and sweat the onions and the garlic on medium fire until a light coloration. Stir carefully. Rain the flour in, then fold gently for around 1 minute. Add the white wine and loosen the mass with a wooden spoon.

- add 1,5 liter lukewarm water(!). Add the bouquet garni, salt and pepper and bring to a boil. Lower the fire and let simmer during 35 minutes.

- heat your oven-grill. Pour the soup in individual bowls. Put 3 slices of grilled bread on and cover with the Emmental.

- Put the bowls in an ovendish and fill with 2 cm of water. Let the cheese gratinate under the ovengrill until it colors nicely. Serve immediately.

- An additional remark is added; you can change the water by the same amount of chicken stock if you want a more pronounced flavour.

As for the wine, it's clear that the suggestion is to use a dry white wine, so a sauvignon blanc, chenin, chardonnay is ok. Don't use Alsacer Gewurtztraminer, it tastes very strongly, mainly of lychee, it is a perfect wine to serve with Asian food, I wouldn't use it in an onion soup. The wine added is merely a good dash (around 1/3th of a cup). Other Alsace whites are ok except "vendanges tardives" of course.

I have made onion soups in the past using beef stockf, but as you can see, water is used instead; the onions are indeed 1st violin! I always used thyme in my onion soup, but here they suggest a bouquet garni.

I'm a little surprised noone on the forum suggests cheddar cheese wich is abundantly available in outstanding quality on the US market, I believe. Cheddar has a very nice acidity and I wouldn't be surprised if it turned out to be the best choice of cheese for this dish!!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 May 2012 at 09:57
hey, everyone - great replies here since my last post. i'll try to address them all here, and then i'll give an update.

melissa - nope, i'm afraid there's no fresh market even close to here. i am pretty sure the closest raclette cheese is possibly (but not necessarily) in great falls, which is 130 miles away. it's possible that that it would be necessary to go even farther than that! the 50% swiss/50% italian blend seemed to work really well, but one of these days i really am going to have to "splurge" and order some raclette and/or other "more authentic" cheese for this soup.

ahron - i know how you feel about such recipes. i have a sentimental favourite that my wife made for our first evening at home together, wich we simply call Hamburger Pie;

http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/hamburger-pie_topic1055.html

daikon - referencing your earlier comment about thomas keller and his 5 hours of slow-cooking the onions, i can easily see it happening, now that i'm trying to be more aware of the process in order to maximise the flavour potential. champagne vinegar? i'll have to see if i can find some of that ~ i gave keller's method a good read-over and i'm liking a lot of those ideas; will see about incorporating them as i can into my method.

chris - some interesting ideas in your post that i would like to try; chief among them of course is the white wine. i've only made it with merlot up until now, but i will qualify that statement by saying that it has always been a very inexpensive merlot that didn't seem to add any over-abundance of sweetness. my results have always been really good (and better each successive time i make it, as i develop and refine my preparation), and my perception has always been (based on aroma, taste etc) that the red merlot complimented and added depth to the beef and onion flavours of the soup. then again, i have no other preparation to compare it with, so i could easily be missing out on something even better than this preparation, which i truly enjoy. for the sugar, i have always used "raw" (turbinado") sugar, which seems less-sweet to me that white sugar.

i agree with you and daikon about the SLOW cooking of the onions for the best results - the slow cooking is always my goal, and never to over-cook or (horrors!) scorch or burn them, but to bring them right up to the point where they have that wonderful deeply-carmelised look, aroma and flavour.

i would really like to try the same basic recipe, using white wine as you suggest. do you have a recommendation for a white wine that would be good for it? the most common ones i have available are chardonnay, sauvignon blanc, pinot grigio, moscato, riesling or gewürztraminer. also, i am guessing that in order to follow the spirit of your suggestion, i should omit the sugar as well?

i will definitely give your suggestions a try, probably within a month if i can.

as for this latest preparation, it got off to a wonderful, beautiful start. i had all the ingredients according to the recipe, prep work went well, and i really was hoping that this would be the best preparation of all. i took some really good (i hope) pictures of the beginning of the process, and everything seemed truly on track. unfortunately, the slow carmelising and cooking of the onions in my enameled dutch oven (on medium heat) took much, much longer than expected.

due to the fact that the beautiful mrs. tas has a work schedule requiring her to get up very early in the morning (she is a registered long-term care nurse), and she was scheduled to work this weekend - my late start on the soup ran up against her bedtime, and it was necessary to rush the finishing of the soup before the onions could really develop. the resulting soup was still really good-tasting, but the colours were way off (kind of a whitish pink or pinkish white) and the flavours were quite unfinished. lesson learned: i will start at least an hour (maybe two) earlier next time.
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Daikon View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 May 2012 at 06:55
If you want to go faster, the pressure cooker and baking soda technique from Modernist Cuisine just might work as well with onions as it does with carrots.
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ChrisFlanders View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ChrisFlanders Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 May 2012 at 06:25
You pointed out the right thing to do, Daikon, which is as you said "very slowly caramelizing until they are a deep brown". Many times onions and garlic get blackenend too soon on too high fire, which makes people assume they are doing the right thing, but that blackening will taste often very bitter. Personally I go maximum to a stage of a light golden brown on very low fire.
 
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