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Saucijzenbroodjes

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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    Posted: 11 October 2018 at 14:32
Hello, Hans, and welcome to the Foods of the World Forum! We certainly hope to see more of you and look forward to what you will have to share with us.

In the meantime, please do feel free to introduce yourself in our New Members section, as well - if you have any questions or problems, let us know.

Take care ~

Ron
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hans Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 October 2018 at 14:20
Excellent "gehakt" formula.  My grandma's recipe added some breadcrums or Panko.
Hans
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 December 2016 at 10:38
Nice, Mike - I'll be honest, I like the look of your Oma's recipe and method. The grandmothers always know best!

If you try this soon, let us know how it goes! I'll eventually try them - just a matter of finding time and having ingredients at the same time.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 November 2016 at 10:49
I had a chance to dig through my mom's recipe folder this weekend and found my Oma's recipe for saucijzenbroodjes. Surprisingly it's not the same as any listed above.  First, it does not appear to use puff pastry, but more of a pie dough. I'm going to have to give this a shot one of these days. Her recipe is:

Saucijzenbroodjes

Dough:
1 cup butter
2 cups sifted flour
8 Tblsp ice water

Sift flour. Cut butter into flour until pea-sized balls form. Add ice water 1 spoon at a time until dough forms. Continue kneading until it forms a ball. Divide dough in half, wrap in wax paper and chill 1 hour.

Filling:
1 lb pork sausage (already seasoned)
-or-
1 lb ground pork
1 Tbsp varkensvlees kruiden*
1 large egg
1/4 cup paneermeel**

In a mixing bowl mix ingredients with:
1 tsp dried onion
1/4 tsp seasoning salt

Roll 1 ball of dough onto floured board into a 12" x 12" rectangle. Cut into 4 inch squares for 9 sausage rolls (or 3 inch squares for 18 smaller rolls). Place about 1 Tbsp sausage onto dough and roll the dough around the meat. Place onto a greased baking sheet seam side down. Wisk 1 egg yolk with 1 Tbsp water and brush over rolls.

Bake 400 degrees 20 minutes or until golden brown.

* Varkensvlees kruiden means Pork Seasoning and refers to any one of several store bought spice mixes. Similar to how in the American grilling and BBQ world there are tons of rubs available in your local market (at least nowadays there are), every Dutch market has a section for kruiden (spices) that include everything from fish to meatballs. I highly doubt Oma would have made her own. I'll have to see if I can come up with a recipe for this though.

** Paneermeel is bread crumbs. I'm guessing these are probably just straight breadcrumbs, not seasoned.

Mike
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ChrisFlanders Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 April 2012 at 05:10

Hey Mike, this suggestion is completely redundant, but I sure hope you take good care of that book and certainly put it to use. Whenever I can be of assistance for translation, don't hesitate to ask.

Daikon has some points on puff pastry. In my own country, a long time ago, but not as far as 1910, on feasty occasions like Easter, Chrismas etc. people ordered puff pastry thingies from the bakery; vol-au-vent cups, "fleurons" which are little half-moons that were put on posh fish dishes and of course tartes with a puff pastry crust, including the very popular "tompoes" aka "tompouce" which are small pastries filled with crème pâtissière; I'm not entirely sure but I think you call these Napoleons? Tompoes (pronounce tom poose) look like this (source of this picture is the internet, it's not mine);

 

There's nothing like crumbly, flaky puff pastry that contain a lot of layers as being made by professional bakers. In french some puff pastry made products are called "millefeuille", meaning thousand sheets, which indicates it has to have lots of alternating layers of flour and butter. Storebought puff pastry is such a different thing especially when not made with butter.

However, that little sentence in Mike's book where it says "make feuilletée as usual" struck my attention. It indicates that a long time ago homecooks made it, even repeatedly. I'm sure that certainly in France there were many homecooks making their own, even nowadays. Contempory homecooks are even much better equiped than our grandmothers since modern cooks have refrigeration, almost an absolute must when making puff pastry with good butter. i never made it myself, I'm not so much a baker and making really good puff pastry is a bit out of my league (read: I have an excellent source for buying it).

Croissants are made with kind of a puff pastry with yeast in it. I only know this since watching it being made on our foodTV. When interested, here's the video, in dutch of course. It's Roger Van Damme, a fantastic (dessert) cook, recently awarded with a Michelin star.

http://www.njam.tv/recepten/franse-roomboter-croissants

About Roger Van Damme, good friends with the famous Sergio Herman from Holland and Albert Adriá who used to be responsable for the desserts at El Bulli.

http://www.njam.tv/chefs/roger-van-damme

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2012 at 19:03
i have a feeling you're probably right about that - special occasions etc. always seem to get kicked up a notch.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2012 at 18:02
This is probably why there are variants like the short-dough-wrapped pig-in-the-blankets that I mentioned earlier: puff pastry was too much work, unavailable, or too expensive (the last of which would undoubtedly have been the opinion of my Dutch ancestors....)  I can easily see Saucijzenbroodjes in puff pastry being an occasional, out-on-the-town treat, while the simpler pigs were more make-at-home staples.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2012 at 15:01
point taken, daikon ~ perhaps the puff pastry was a bad example of what i was trying to say.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2012 at 14:40
Thumbs Up Daikon.
 
One aspect of this is that home cooks, of necessity, try to be all things, and be equally good at them.
 
There are reasons, though, why the savory side and the pastry side of a professional kitchen are run separately. Different skill sets, is why.
 
Yeah, Ron, everybody should try everything at least once. No argument. But you remember the great words of W.C. Fields? "If at first you don't succeed, try again. Then quit. No sense making a damn fool of yourself."
 
Me, I've had my tries at puff pastry. Now I'll let the pros do it for me.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2012 at 14:24
you gotta do it like grandma or great-grandma did

I'm pretty sure that none of my grandmothers or great-grandmothers ever made puff pastry.  It has always been a specialty preparation made mostly by professional bakers or pastry chefs.  If your grandmother or great-grandmother was lucky enough to have eaten puff pastry with some regularity and you want to do it just like grandma did, then the right approach is probably to buy finished product from someone else.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2012 at 13:14
true, brook - very difficult, and i would certainly not fault anyone for buying puff pastry ~
 
but on the same note i really believe that to get down to it and elarn the fundamentals, you gotta do it like grandma or great-grandma did and at least try making it once or twice. to me (and this is just me, i don't expect anyone to agree) a person who makes a slightly-faulty puff pastry will get more out of the experience than a person who buys a perfect puff pastry.
 
having said that, the ready-made things are an important convenience and a way for people to try things that they might not get to try otherwise, so there are some good sides - it's a double-edged sword, but i'll lean toward the old-school any day of the week ~
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2012 at 13:11
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

go ahead and do it right, if you can ~ 
 
As a general thing, Ron, I certainly agree with this philosophy. But.....have you ever actually made puff pastry?
 
There are certain things best left to professionals. IMO, puff pastry is one of them.


It's pretty much like making croissants right? I haven't had the nerve to try that one yet either, but someday I will.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2012 at 13:01
go ahead and do it right, if you can ~ 
 
As a general thing, Ron, I certainly agree with this philosophy. But.....have you ever actually made puff pastry?
 
There are certain things best left to professionals. IMO, puff pastry is one of them.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2012 at 11:59
Originally posted by ChrisBelgium ChrisBelgium wrote:

Your cookbook must indeed be many years old, Mike. The first sentence "Bereid op de gewone wijze feuilletée.." says it all. It says "prepare puff pastry the usual way". Indeed, feuilletée is none other than puff pastry. Any modern cookbook would have said; buy a roll of puff pastry.
 
This recipe you posted dates from the time where people made their own puff pastry which is notoriously time consuming and difficult to make it right!
We want more from that book, well, I do! I love to make "worstenbroodjes" (sausage breads) as we call them on occasion. There's a village nearby who has some sort of an regional recognition for very similar worstenbroodjes. They call them "piros", seems to be a recipe that goes back ages.


It's definitely an old book. I'm not sure exactly how old, because it doesn't have a printing date in it. But the foreword is dated 1910.  It's the 11th printing, so the book itself is probably from the 1920s, but the recipe could be anywhere from 1890s-1920s. My Oma got it when she graduated from huishoudschool in the late 1920s.


I've asked my mom to scan it for me when she can, I'd love to go through some of the old recipes and try to make some of them the old-school way.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2012 at 10:13
Quote Your cookbook must indeed be many years old, Mike. The first sentence "Bereid op de gewone wijze feuilletée.." says it all. It says "prepare puff pastry the usual way". Indeed, feuilletée is none other than puff pastry. Any modern cookbook would have said; buy a roll of puff pastry.
 
This recipe you posted dates from the time where people made their own puff pastry which is notoriously time consuming and difficult to make it right!
 
We want more from that book, well, I do!
 
there's a saying here in america, "ain't no school like the old school," and that certainly applies here.
 
give me the home-made puff pastry (or nearly home-mnade ANYTHING) over store-bought any day. on weeknights or for "everyday" cooking, i have no problem with busy familes taking a few shortcuts, but for weekend,s holidays, special events or for people who really love to cook, go ahead and do it right, if you can ~ 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ChrisFlanders Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2012 at 09:56
Your cookbook must indeed be many years old, Mike. The first sentence "Bereid op de gewone wijze feuilletée.." says it all. It says "prepare puff pastry the usual way". Indeed, feuilletée is none other than puff pastry. Any modern cookbook would have said; buy a roll of puff pastry.
 
This recipe you posted dates from the time where people made their own puff pastry which is notoriously time consuming and difficult to make it right!
We want more from that book, well, I do! I love to make "worstenbroodjes" (sausage breads) as we call them on occasion. There's a village nearby who has some sort of an regional recognition for very similar worstenbroodjes. They call them "piros", seems to be a recipe that goes back ages.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 April 2012 at 21:53
I was looking through all of mom's old cookbooks while I was over there for easter today. Here's a recipe for saucijzebroodjes from a turn of the century Dutch cookbook.



My (probably poor) translation of it.

for the dough:
125 gr hard butter or hay butter or calf kidney fat
125 gr flour, some salt, some water (about 1/4 cup)

for the filling:
75 gr veal sausage
75 gr pork sausage
25 gr stale bread
pepper, salt and nutmeg

Prepare dough in the usual way (see recipe 853).  Grind the meat through the grinder again, mixed in the usual manner with a bit of pepper, salt and nutmeg, and make small rolls. Roll the dough out until it's fairly thin, and cut pieces about 4 inches by 6 inches. Put a roll of meat on the dough, fold the dough around it and use water to seal. Put the rolls sealed side down on a baking sheet and cut slits in the top with a knife. Brush with egg yolks beaten with some water or milk. Bake in a fairly warm oven (400 Fahrenheit) until light brown and cooked through (about 20 minutes)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 October 2011 at 10:16
and they're all good ~ i'd like to try these saucijzenbroodjes - they look like a perfect thing for this time of year!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 October 2011 at 09:53
yep yep! To me, when you say pig in a blanket I immediately think a breakfast sausage wrapped in a pancake. Mmmm. So many local varieties of the same thing.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 October 2011 at 14:51
u the man - thanks!
 
funny thing about names - when i was a kid, a pig in a blanket was a hot dog or little smokie wrapped in a crescent roll - basically a suburban version of what daikon describes above. then when i grew up and met my wife, pigs in a blanket were a whole different thing to her, based on her family history:
 
 
it's all good, as far as i am concerned! Clap
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