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Székely Gulyás

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Melissa Mead View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Székely Gulyás
    Posted: 30 October 2020 at 16:15
Just made this for Halloween. It's so good!
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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 December 2016 at 10:35
Hey, Zomborama - welcome to the FoTW forum! You did a great job with that, and I'd say that it looks incredible.

We're looking forward to seeing more of you here - take care!

Ron
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2016 at 04:49
I know this is an old thread but.....

We love it when old threads are reawakened, Zomborama, especially when there's a new take on the subject. So no need to apologize.

Welcome to our little corner of the culinary world. Based on this entry, I know we're gonna love having you here.

Why not head up to the Members Lounge and tell us a little about yourself: where you're from, your culinary interests, and so forth.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote zomborama Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 November 2016 at 10:42
I know this is an old thread but I just made this dish over the weekend and I notice a striking similarity with Polish Hunter's Stew (bigos) which uses sauerkraut, pork and smoked sausage. Hungary and Poland have historically had close ties and I wonder if this is one of those hybrid dishes that came from the Carpathian Mts.

I made this with beef instead of pork and added smoked paprika. I have to say this was quite amazing.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 December 2015 at 18:19
This really is good stuff - unique and very tasty. I made a slightly-modified version a few nights ago, using bits and bobs that I got from trimming off a pork sirloin roast (the really cheap roast where the loin connects to the hindquarter). 

I shaved off the fat (there wasn't much) and cut it into small pieces/shavings, then cut the meat off the hip bone and into cubes/shavings. Next, I rendered out the fat, leaving the "cracklin's" in the Dutch oven on the stove top. This resulted in just enough rendered fat so that I could cook up a couple of diced onions, sear the pork cubes, and add some garlic, salt, pepper and a butt-load of paprika. Next, I added little stock, a couple of fresh, diced tomatoes and some sliced mushrooms (not in the original recipe, but very much recommended!). 

I then put the heavy lid back onto the Dutch oven and simmered the beautiful mess for an hour and a half or so. When it was ready to serve, I beat some flour into some sour cream, stirred it in, simmered a little longer (10 or 15 minutes) so that everything could get happy...and voila

I served it over mashed potatoes - the family and I really, really enjoyed it. The only thing that was really missing was the sauerkraut.

Anyway - extremely good, and easy - I'm hoping that you enjoy it, too, if you try it!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 June 2014 at 07:27
Now, with Paprikas, it was always pork or chicken, sour cream was added, and the paprika taste was more noticable.

Again, there must be housewife-to-housewife differences. Friend Wife's aunt often make beef paprikas.

For our upcoming themed dinner we're including gombapaprikas, which is a traditional paprikas made with mushrooms.

I suspect your basic idea is correct: Goulas normally is light on paprika and doesn't use sour cream. Paprikas is heavy on the magic red powder, and uses sour cream.
But we hae meat and we can eat
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 June 2014 at 00:04
My experience is pretty much the same as yours, even 9or perhaps especially) with Hungrian cuisine.

Nevertheless, the name stuck, for some reason, and this is how it came to be known. I tried to address this weird non-conformity in the opening words of my post:

Quote Székely Gulyás is a true rebel - it is quite interesting in that it breaks all of the traditional "gulyás rules." The dish generally uses pork - rather than the usual beef - sometimes it even uses a combination of meats! Further, it adds sauerkraut (unheard of!), and cream is added to the resulting sauce (scandalous!), making this dish a unique and intriguing exception to the normal gulyás methods that can be found elsewhere in Hungary and throughout Central and Eastern Europe. 

The dish's non-conformist character extends even further, to its nomenclature; the "Glittering Eye" blogreports: 

Quote [T]his "must be one of the most mis-named dishes in all of cuisine. The name, Székely gulyás, pronounced seh-key goo-yahsh (sort of) means “Gypsy goulash” in Hungarian. Only it probably isn’t a Gypsy recipe and it’s not a goulash. It’s technically a pork pörkölt with sauerkraut and sour cream.

http://theglitteringeye.com/?p=624 

This just occurred to me: maybe it is simply a name that they use as a joke?

in any case, I believe like you, that gulyas and paprikas are more....methods, than actual recipes. Same with polkott....
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 May 2014 at 11:27
Thing is; I'm going on a whim here, just based on personal experience.  

When I have had what is called Goulash, or Gulyas, if you prefer; It has always been beef based and there was no sour cream added. Even the paprika was not really noticable.

Now, with Paprikas, it was always pork or chicken, sour cream was added, and the paprika taste was more noticable.

I don't know if there is much difference in Hungary between the two, perhaps not.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 May 2014 at 11:57
Darko - during my research on this, I turned up a lot of surpises; mainly that ethnically, this is definitely all, with no American influence. the origins of it attest to that. I've found rferences to it - as a gulyas - in Hungary, Slovakia and if I remember correctly, Transylvania. It simply "breaks all the rules" for whatever reason, and the name is simply the name. 

Ahron - the flavours here are really something. Its origins and traditions are with pork, but no reason that you can't make it with another meat. I hope you're able to try it!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote africanmeat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 May 2014 at 06:42
Man it looks good  if next week will be cold i will do this dish .with mash .
thanks  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2014 at 20:33
OK, I think I finally have this figured out... sort of.  This is probably a North American view more than anything. But Gulyas is beef and no sour cream. Papprikas can be chicken or pork and has sour cream, and more paprika so that it is the dominant flavour. Not necessarily overpowering, but dominating.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2013 at 16:14
I can attest that it does---whatever we call it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2013 at 15:46
Hey, as long as it tastes good.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2013 at 06:45
Originally posted by AK1 AK1 wrote:

I'm looking at this recipe, and I'm thinking this is more like a Paprikash. I'm not familiar with doing any sort of gulash and adding sour cream.

That's the point, Darko ~ it's breakin' da rules! Evil Smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2013 at 06:40
What are the differences between a gulyas and a paprikas, Darko?

While I'm certainly not an authority, my impression had always been that a paprikas was a subcategory; that gulyas referred to any stew. Thus, a beef paprikas would be a gulyas, but not all beef goulashes are necessarily paprikases.

That aside, virtually all the variation of Szekely identify it as a gulyas.

So, time for a little research:

In the Bennett & Clark book, there's a generic recipe merely identified as Gulyas, attributed to a Mrs Wiley Pogany, a noted Hungarian hostess of the time. It does not, as you indicate, use sour cream.

The usually helpful "International Cuisine" isn't, in this case. It defines Goulash as "A type of beef stew from Hungary that always contains paprika." And the only gulyas recipe it contains is for Szegediner Gulasch, which does use sour cream. But it's merely the Austrian version of the Szekely.

Time/Life's "The Cooking of Vienna's Empire" supports your contention. It says, "Classic gulyas, authorities insist, is never made of mutton or pork, and its gravy is almost never finished with sour cream." However, it points out that the same authorities agree the one exception is szekely gulyas, which uses a combination of meats or pork alone, and to which sour cream is added.

I'm wondering now if the Bennett & Clark recipe isn't nearer the mark and its piddling teaspoon of paprika was added just because "this is a Hungarian dish, so has to have paprika, by Gawd!"

Be that as it may, I'm convinced, at this point, that you are correct. In general, gulyas does not contain sour cream and is almost always made strictly with beef.

An interesting side-light emerged from my reading. Although Ron's introductory post calls this a Transylvanian stew, that's probably incorrect. It seems that there are three hallmarks of Transylvanian origination: the shape the meat is cut, the use of black pepper rather than paprika, and the nomenclature. Transylvanian stews end with "tokany", rather than with the flatlander "gulyas."

Amazing the trivia one can pick up.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 November 2013 at 23:02
I'm looking at this recipe, and I'm thinking this is more like a Paprikash. I'm not familiar with doing any sort of gulash and adding sour cream.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 November 2013 at 20:27
Brook - I do appreciate the vote of confidence - this recipe was indeed delicious, and very homey, as well. The version you made seems (if I remember the recipe correctly) a little closer to the Szegedinský guláš that seems to be popular in Slovakia - maybe they really are separate dishes, but I suspect it is more likely that they are the same dish with regional and seasonal differences....

Rod - I thought I tried the homestyle? I remember it being good and soupy. Possibly a little thicker than your preference, but otherwise the same? I'll go read through, and take a second look....
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rod Franklin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 November 2013 at 21:17
Ron, I don't really know from what part of Hungary proper we're from. My sister probably knows. The Hungarian Empire was/is a big place and Slovakia used to be/still is part of it. Still Hungarians, just with a different name.Tongue

Not much tomato use in my relations cooking. And all these types of dishes could only be called soup in my experience. Served in bowls and eaten with spoons.

Filled cabbage however, would always have tomatoes. That might have come from many years in Detroit and being influenced by a substantial Polish community there.

I've been served plenty of sauerkraut and rye bread, both with caraway seeds. I always thought that was German.

Sweat some onions in some pork fat, add paprika, then water and meat and boil awhile. Add some sour cream and dumplings and what do you have? The basis of this dish and hendl and chicken paprikas and who knows what others. But know for certain it's of the Hungarian Empire.

This dish certainly looks like something to try and I will. I've got chicken on deck for this weekend though and I have to admit chicken paprikas is my Hungarian comfort food, so I'm going there. I've got some hulka in the freezer too.

It makes me real happy that you've found the dumplings a 'go to' recipe at your house. Now if I could get you to try making home style chicken paprikas...Wink Maybe we could work something out.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 November 2013 at 20:08
Ever try a new recipe and just know it was off before you cooked anything.

So it is with this dish. Ron and I have been discussing it, off list, for some time; particularly comparing various Hungarian, Slovak, and Transylvania versions.

The recipe I have comes from Paula Bennett and Velma Clark's book, The Art of Hungarian Cooking. I knew something was wrong right off, because it only calls for a teaspoonful of paprika. Ron suggested it might be Transylvanian in origin. But that didn't sound right, either. Most of the time, whereas Hungarian stews end in gulas, Transylvanian stews end in tokany. For instance, Borjutokany is a Transylvanian veal stew.

When I made their version of Szekely Gulyas it was tasty enough. But it lacked the rich color and depth of Ron's.

On a hunch I looked up the publishing history of the book. It was first published in 1954, in hard cover. My soft-cover version was put out in 1967.

My only conclusion is that they adapted the recipes to meet American tastes, and cut way back on the paprika. They just went overboard in this case. Even if it were a typo, and was supposed to be 1 tbls, that doesn't cut it. In a dish like this, 2 tablespoons would be about the minimum I'd go with.

Their version, btw, also calls for lean pork, which I thought strange. I used a piece of loin I had in the freezer. But that makes for a fairly expensive dish. And the lack of fat contributes to the lack of richness and depth as well.

Next time it'll be Ron's version.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 November 2013 at 19:43
Thanks for the kind words, Rod - I can't tell you how good this was. it simply has to be experienced ~ 

And..... speaking of your fix, you could do a LOT worse than this, if you are looking for a way to enjoy onions, paprika, sour cream and dumplings!

Re-reading, I see a few minor grammatical things to clean up - and will do so later - but other than that, this recipe is good to go, and I am pretty sure you especially would fall in love with it. Leave the tomato element out, if you prefer; I believe that is the one other difference between this and the Slovak version....

Perhaps your Hungarian ancestors were Slovak??? Shocked
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