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Germans from Russia - Manitoba Farmer Sausage

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Percebes View Drop Down
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    Posted: 22 September 2016 at 14:11
Originally posted by TasunkaWitko TasunkaWitko wrote:

Good to know - thank you. No citric acid, then.

Quote Better to leave it out entirely and just allow a slower natural lactic acid conversion.


I generally let my sausage hang a day or three both before and after smoking. I hadn't thought of it before, but they have a little tang of their own - perhaps this is why ~

I believe that you are right.
You are way ahead of your time RonClap
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 September 2016 at 13:44
Good to know - thank you. No citric acid, then.

Quote Better to leave it out entirely and just allow a slower natural lactic acid conversion.


I generally let my sausage hang a day or three both before and after smoking. I hadn't thought of it before, but they have a little tang of their own - perhaps this is why ~
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 September 2016 at 13:41
Hold off on the Citric Acid.

Not the same as Vitamin C/Ascorbic Acid. Can destroy the texture and turn your meat white and very crumbly.

Ascorbic acid has dual action supporting the proper fermentation and as a colour fix speeding nitrite release for richer darker hues from the myoglobin. Citric acid  is a poor boy artificial tang substitute that easily alters texture.

Even when used in meats it has to be in encapsulated form so it does not destroy the texture.
Better to leave it out entirely and just allow a slower natural lactic acid conversion.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 September 2016 at 13:31
Gotcha!

I actually have some citric acid that my son had asked me to buy the last time I was at a brewing supply store in Billings. I'll either use that, or get some unflavoured Vitamin C.

As for corn sugar, I've never used it! I've always used honey, maple syrup or agave nectar for bottling my beer. I should pick some up, though.

I'll try the substitutions and see how it goes. For me, it will be no huge worry, as my thinking is that your typical German/Russian farmer might not have the "proper" stuff available all the time, either.

Many thanks, again -
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 September 2016 at 13:22
I suppose you could leave the ascorbic acid out, but it should be readily/cheaply available in powder form as unflavoured Powdered Vitamin C at the Walmart Pharmacy in Havre.

Dextrose is preferred for fermentation  because it breaks down readily, but white sugar could be substituted if you don't have any corn sugar lying around from your  wine/beer making exploits.

Not my recipe so I can not speak as to how substitutions will impact the intent of the original recipe.
Sometimes we must make sacrifices those of us that live in untamed areasOuchSleepy
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 September 2016 at 11:27
Thanks for posting that, Murray - it looks really, really good to me.

A couple of quick questions:

a) if one doesn't have dextrose, would an equal amount of brown sugar work for this?

b) same question regarding ascorbic acid - is there a commonly-found substitute that might work?

Thanks!

Ron



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 September 2016 at 10:17
Prairie Farmer Sausage
100% Boneless Pork Butts
35-38mm hog casings

Spices and Seasonings per kg of Pork
20.00g Curing Salt-This is a European Standard- hard to get here so I use 17g salt and 3g cure #1
3.00g Dextrose
2.00g Coarse ground black pepper
0.50g Ground coriander
3.00g Ground red paprika 
2.00g Ascorbic acid

Process
1. Grind pork through a 6.5mm plate and place in a plastic tub
2. Combine all spices and seasonings and sift through a strainer to remove lumps-Combine with ground meat and mix well.
3. Re-grind through the same plate and add 150ml of ice water per kg of meat and add to the mix-Place in cooler overnight or longer for more tang.
4. Stuff into casings and link to 12cm. Wrap around smoke sticks and hang in smoker.
5. Smoke with dampers open to dry casings-then smoke with dampers 1/4 open until desired colour is reached.
6. Sausage is left uncooked at this stage-Package and freeze what will not be used at this time.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 September 2016 at 10:02
I appreciate that, sir - thank you very much!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 September 2016 at 14:00
Yes. There is a Sausage making book in my possession written by an Alberta based sausage maker by the name of Brian Pay.
His book is called " The Best of Wurst".

He did not grow up eating this particular type of sausage so he had no benchmark in his memory, but his friend brought him some from Manitoba and asked him if he could duplicate it.
I believe he has gotten pretty close. It uses modern ingredients and methods and seems to come reasonably close to traditional flavours.
I will dig the book out of storage and post it at my earliest convenience.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 September 2016 at 12:30
Murray, I finally had time to read this, rather than just look at the pictures. I love the story behind this one!

Some impressions and ideas, for the sake of discussion! Correct me if I am wrong, but it looks like we're talking about a basic farmer's sausage that is composed of what's available, subject to any tweaks that the particular household might prefer. I remember a saying "from the old country" that "cows are for milking, pigs are for eating" - in America, of course, this axiom would not apply so much, as beef was and continues to be a thriving industry. Some households appear to have added sugar, white pepper etc., while others went with just salt and pepper. It also appears that smoking was optional, as well. I'm guessing that the tang of fermentation might have to do with the fact that much of this sausage must have hung around in the larder or the shed before it got smoked or consumed, allowing some fermentation. I find myself wondering whether this tang is a happy byproduct of the circumstances - making it a special treat - or the sought-out goal of those making the sausage?

I also agree 100% about the cure, especially with any sausage that is intended to be hanging around for any length of time. I am not so concerned with whole cuts of meat (especially non-pork), but sausage opens up a much-increased risk of botulism due to the anaerobic environment. Perhaps the muslin casings diminished this risk somewhat? I don't know, but I would still use a modern cure.

Thank you for your efforts on continuing a true "Germans from Russia" experience. If you don't mind, I'd like to add a link to this thread on my list of "GfR" foods and recipes!

Question - did we ever nail down a recipe that carries the old, traditional flavor using modern ingredients and methods?

Let me know, and thanks!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2016 at 19:11
Good grief, that looks beautiful!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 March 2016 at 18:30
Day 3 of a Oak Cold Smoke - Usually start smoking at noon. Load again before bed and get about 7 hours smoke on a fill in my ProQ. Then I stack the racks in the sun at 7am and let dry and mature in the breeze. Overnight lows of -2C-Highs about 5C so perfect for this method.

Made Dave's Potato Pancakes the other day and saved a few-so supper will be Farmers Sausage-Potato Pancakes and Sour Cream
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 March 2016 at 07:03
   Interesting sounding sausage
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 March 2016 at 14:06
Mrs Percebes out to the quilt Guild for the day and I felt that this was a perfect crime of opportunity.

So I am making a version of the original that breaks tradition from the Mennonite recipe by using some strongly flavored spices.
I am also adding Fermento to assist in the Fermented flavor.
Will have to rest the batch in the fridge until Tuesday which is the next time I can get some Oak Dust for my Pro Q.

Will be super tangy by then.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 November 2014 at 12:24
I've got another batch going as we speak. What I did this time is add some chopped mushrooms to the meat mix. They're in the garage smoking away. Once they have some smoke, I'll throw them in the oven at 170F to cook, then give them a quick chill in ice water.

Thanks Murray, you've made me an addict.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 November 2014 at 09:40
Here is some of the commercial Farmers Sausage from a small town Southwest of Winnipeg.
Winkler Farmer Sausage

It was not near as smoky as I remember, so I let it dry a few hours and gave it a 8 hour cold smoke with some Oak
It is the 2 sticks on the left




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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 November 2014 at 10:54

I am pleased that you liked it. You have motivated me to action.

I bought a new 11lb stuffer as well as a cold smoke device that is supposed to produce 10-12 hours of smoke on 100g of wood dust so I am twisting some up this next weekend.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 November 2014 at 21:51
I'm really diggin' this sausage. Thanks Murray!Thumbs Up
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 November 2014 at 20:11
Originally posted by Percebes Percebes wrote:

I feel guilty for the confusion.
The original recipe is quite old and does not comply with modern food safety standards.
What is never mentioned is that due to a lack of refrigeration at the time, the recipe of Pork, Salt and Pepper likely sat out for a few days and started fermentation.
This results in a relatively tame sausage but with a very unique tang similar to what would occur in a summer sausage.

This sausage needs to be cold smoked.
The recipes that are showing cure are just trying to be compliant with modern understanding of the food safety risks associated with smoking meats without a suitable cure.


In the spirit of the original intent of the sausage you sound like you would like to keep it simple. I applaud this , but would never recommend smoking sausage without a cure.
Don't feel bad; I don't have an issue with the procedure. I'm not too concerned with making the sausage without cure. What I'm trying to get is the taste. It's that baseline that I'm looking for. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 November 2014 at 12:36
The inconsistencies in the available recipes has been perplexing to me, so I did a little sleuthing.

In her book "Mennonite Foods & Folkways from South Russia Volume 1", author Norma Jost Voth( Good Books-1990) relates that pork was the mainstay meat of the Mennonites in South Russia in the 1870's.
They knew little about Beef until they immigrated to North America in 1874.

This got me thinking about how I always felt that Farmers sausage always had a tangy quality that reminded me of Summer Sausage.
So I looked at the recipe in the above book and a interesting situation revealed itself.

Summer Sausage
Rintsworscht/ Reetjeworscht
Tina Friesen Klassen: Rintsworscht is sausage made with ground beef which is smoked and let hang a while. It is eaten raw with sliced onions and vinegar.

50 lbs beef
4 handsful salt
4 tsp black pepper
8 tsp white pepper
1 1/2 lbs brown sugar
2 ozs. saltpeter
2 1/2 lbs salt
Muslin Jockers*

* Homemade casings made by sewing pieces of unbleached muslin together to form a bag 4" x 16" to hold the meat.

Grind beef very fine. Season with salt, fresh black and white pepper. Stuff the meat mixture into muslin jockers and place on a flat surface.

Rub with a mixture of brown sugar, saltpeter and meat salt. Lay a board on top of the sausage to weigh it down.
Every two or three days, rub the sausage with more of the sugar and salt mixture until it is all used..
Smoke in a smokehouse for 1 1/2 hours. Brush with melted paraffin. Hang meat in a cool dry place until ready to use.

After reading this all it occurred to me that Farmer's sausage is a hybrid recipe that came about from the blending of two different cultures, two very different economic circumstances and two different types of meat.

The basic recipe is just Pork , Salt and Pepper, but then has been modified with the Beef Summer Sausage recipe practice of curing the stuffed product separately resulting in a unique fermented flavor.
This is speculation on my part, but it would splain a lot.:)



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