Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > The US and Canada > The Midwest and Great Plains
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Germans from Russia - Sausage Recipes
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Germans from Russia - Sausage Recipes

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
Author
Message Reverse Sort Order
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Germans from Russia - Sausage Recipes
    Posted: 19 March 2019 at 12:55
Here's a photo of the finished sausage "in action" -



Due to the hanging of the sausage and reduction of weight, the texture is very nice and the flavours have concentrated a bit, as well. I'd say that this turned out just about as I intended, and am very happy with it.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 March 2019 at 11:59
Agreed, Olyeller - doing it "right" is definitely a process; I'm happy with my "farmhouse style" approach, but one day I'll see if I can do something a little more refined.

We did try this sausage on Friday, and it truly was good. it sliced easily enough, and held together nicely. In spite of the sausage not having any binding agents, it was moist and seemed to have a great texture. The sausage had "reduced" as it dried a bit, concentrating the flavours quite well; I will still see if I can do a better job of retaining of the salt flavor next time, but for the most part I am very, very happy with how this sausage turned out, especially considering some of my improvised methods.

There was a tiny bit of case hardening on the outside, but this is no big deal. We simply wrapped the un-used sausage in clear plastic wrap and put it in the refrigerator, where the moisture content can equalise. The remaining chubs were also wrapped similarly and put in the freezer; they can equalise as they thaw.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Olyeller View Drop Down
Scullery Servant
Scullery Servant
Avatar

Joined: 17 February 2018
Location: Texas
Status: Offline
Points: 11
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Olyeller Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 March 2019 at 22:15
Looks pretty good to me. I'm not familiar with the poached then dried method, but the result looks OK. The empty end may not win you points at the County Fair, but I bet it will eat just as well.
Dry cured sausages will usually wind up covered in white mold, which is part of the process. A true dried sausage is hard to do because you have to keep it at cool temps and closely monitored humidity.
Jerky is easy by comparison.
Let your light shine
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 March 2019 at 08:50
Well, at the risk of demonstrating just how good I am NOT at this sort of thing, here is a photo of one of the chubs of sausage after hanging for a few days at room temperature:



And another:



Sure - why not? One more:



Important note: I'm not looking for a "perfect" sausage, where advanced charcuterie techniques are concerned; this is meant to be a farmhouse thing that would have been made each fall as part of the pig slaughter, then put up for winter and consumed as needed or desired.

Even though I sampled the sausage the first night when it was finished - barely out of the poaching and ice bath - I have not yet sampled this sausage after hanging for a few days; we intend to do so tonight or possibly tomorrow night. This particular chub is going to a friend of mine, the father of one of my school chums who has often shared his projects with me. He is also a "German from Russia," and is in fact a descendant of folks who were not far from my own ancestors.

I'm expecting it to be good, but please note the "open space" at the ends of the casing. Is this a concern? I don't think it is, but would rather hear what the knights of the round table have to say. The sausage is cured and poached until floating, so I don't see any problem; it simply looks like it did a little drying that the casing could not keep up with.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 March 2019 at 09:44
Hey - glad to see you here! Hope that all is well ~

Quick update: my GfR sausage is still hanging and drying a bit so as to firm up a little. I'll see how it is toward the end of the week, if I go out to play some cards with my dad. I don't want or need a salt bomb, but a little is certainly necessary, for balance.

For my next similar project, I was thinking of Slovak, Polish or Ukrainian (klobása, kiełbasa and ковбаса, respectively); but Olyeller's post above reminds me that I should give Don's Czech sausage a go (also klobása). With this in mind, I'll hopefully have something to post about in a month or so.

Olyeller - when the time comes, I might need to check some numbers with you.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Olyeller View Drop Down
Scullery Servant
Scullery Servant
Avatar

Joined: 17 February 2018
Location: Texas
Status: Offline
Points: 11
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Olyeller Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 March 2019 at 09:12
Hello Ron,

I've found when boiling sausage in a soup or pot of beans the saltiness of the sausage is greatly reduced. I bet you are right about what is happening when you poach the links instead of curing them.

I scaled drinks recipe for 5# and it was perfect for me and my German/czech heritage wife.
Let your light shine
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 March 2019 at 10:52
Originally posted by Ron Ron wrote:

My only criticism is that there didn't seem to be any salt flavour at all, so I might increase the addition of salt from 1/4 teaspoon per pound to 1/2 teaspoon per pound next time, then see how it turns out.


I got some thoughts on this from a discussion with MarkR; they made great sense and got me to thinking about the lack of salt flavour, so I am adding it to the discussion.

The poaching process that I used could very well be the culprit where the lack of salt flavor in concerned, due to the chubs sitting in the water. The next time I make this (if I poach them), I try vacuum-sealing the chubs before poaching, so as to keep the salt in the sausage.

Of course, if I am smoking the sausage the correct way (with wood smoke rather than liquid smoke), this will not be a factor, as there is no water to leach out the salt.

In either case, I will hold off on increasing the amount of additional salt (from 1/4 teaspoon per pound to 1/2 teaspoon per pound) until after I've tried these solutions.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 March 2019 at 13:34
Well, everyone - I often make mistakes, and last week it struck me that I've been looking at the first "German Sausage" recipe all wrong.

It's for 40 pounds, so instead of trying to get some weird ratio of ground beef to ground pork and wrapping my head around a lot of conversions, why not just drop some zeros?

So, with that in mind, I set out to make the sausage scaled down to 10% of the original; now, instead of waiting four years to get everything together and be sure that I'm doing it right, I went from getting the ingredients to tasting the final project in four days.

For the sake of convenience, here is the original recipe, as given:

Quote William Brethauer's German Sausage Recipe

3/4 cup salt
1/2 cup black pepper
1/2 of a 1.25 oz. bottle of garlic powder
30 lbs. of ground pork
10 lbs of ground beef
1 cup brown sugar (optional)


What I decided to do is to reduce the amount down to 4 pounds; I also wanted to smoke it, so I used a curing agent rather than salt alone.

My curing agent is Tender Quick, and I knew through experience that 1.5 teaspoons per pound of ground meat is just right for curing sausage; however, at least 1/4 teaspoon of salt per pound needs to be added, for taste. More on this, later.

Using those givens, plus a little leeway in reducing the other ingredients, I came up with these measurements:

Quote Ron's adaptation of Brethauer's German Sausage

3 pounds ground pork
1 pound ground beef
6 teaspoons TQ
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon of granulated garlic
Scant 2.5 teaspoons freshly-ground black pepper
1 tablespoon + 2 teaspoons brown sugar


It looks very close and seemed to be in-line with the intent of the original, so I went ahead and gave this a try, with a couple of variations:

I used dark brown sugar, rather than light.

It is always a good practice to dissolve the spices and cure into some sort of liquid, so as to evenly distribute the flavours and the cure. For this project, I used 1 bottle's worth of "Salmon Fly Honey Rye" ale, from Madison River Brewing Company:

https://madisonriverbrewing.com/ourbrews/salmon-fly-honey-rye

It was at about this time that I finally acknowledged the fact that we were in the 20s and 30s below zero (F), not counting wind chill factors, which drove the temperatures down another 20 degrees or more...and I really didn't want to deal with it. Because of this, I said to hell with smoking the sausage and added 1 teaspoon of Wright's Liquid Smoke per pound of meat (4 teaspoons total).

Don't judge me!

I mixed and kneaded the sausage for 10 minutes with a hand-held potato masher, until it stiffened up nicely. I then covered it with a layer of plastic wrap pressed down on the sausage, put a lid on the bowl and set it in the refrigerator over-night.

The next day, I finished this up. At first, I didn't want to mess with casings and planned on simply rolling the sausage into a few logs inside Saran Wrap or aluminum foil, then heating in the oven at about 200 degrees (poking holes in the foil or Saran Wrap to let excess moisture out) until the internal temperature of the sausage was 153-ish. I even got to thinking that the foil or saran wrap wouldn't be necessary, either - except perhaps for ensuring a tight roll on the logs. In the end, however, I had another idea, thanks to some consultation with our own Mad Hunky, RichTee, who reminded me that poaching the sausage in 160-degree-ish water would do a more uniform job of bringing the sausage to temperature.

At about the same time, I also remembered that I have this sausage kit, from the makers of my Little Chief Smoker:



It is rudimentary, to be sure, but it is easy to use for forming the sausage into nice, uniform logs or chubs. It is efficient and gets the job done...and it's perfect for small projects such as this. I have used it before with great success.

The casings that come with this kit (as well as the forming tube itself) each hold 2/3 of a pound of sausage; I ended up with 7 chubs by the time I was done. I tied them up tightly and then poached them in water that I maintained at about 160 degrees until they floated. After that, I dropped them in an ice bath to stop the cooking process. I then hung them up in a cool area with good airflow so that they can "bloom" and firm up a bit.

I gave one chub of sausage to my #2 son, one to my #4 son and one to my dad; I'll also give one to a family friend who often shares his pickles, sausages and other projects with me. The rest will be saved for snacking on evenings when we are playing cards or socializing, which is exactly what we did last night with the one that I gave to my dad. The sausage was good, well-formed and had nice flavour; my only criticism is that there didn't seem to be any salt flavour at all, so I might increase the addition of salt from 1/4 teaspoon per pound to 1/2 teaspoon per pound next time, then see how it turns out. The other flavours in the sausage were very nice, on point and in great proportion. The beer seemed like a nice addition as well. The texture of the sausage was just fine; it was moist and held together well, with no need for fillers, binders or other similar additives.

In all, my adaptation and scaling down of the original recipe seemed to go very well and I was glad to have finally made this. I highly recommend this sausage - fresh or smoked; just be sure to add a curing agent of your choice if you smoke it, per package directions, and adjust the salt from the original recipe as necessary.

Enjoy!

Ron
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Olyeller View Drop Down
Scullery Servant
Scullery Servant
Avatar

Joined: 17 February 2018
Location: Texas
Status: Offline
Points: 11
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Olyeller Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 September 2018 at 08:16
Originally posted by grouchobear grouchobear wrote:

First of all, thanks to all who have posted recipes and comments in this forum, it has been very helpful.

I've been looking for a recipe for German Sausage for a while now and was really happy to find this. While I'm not German or Russian or ethnic Mennonite I do attend a MB church in the central valley of CA. I asked everyone I could find for a recipe and no one has one. Everyone talks about how their grandparents used to make it but it seems that writing down the recipe just isn't in the MB DNA.

I've made the original recipe (scaled down to 10lbs) a couple of time now. While it is really good it's just not quite what I'm after. I've added the sugar both times and the sausage just tastes a little on the sweet side. I'm going to try and reduce the sugar by 1/2 next time to see if that gets me closer to what I'm familiar with.


I use this recipe from drinks shown in a post above. It has only 4tbls sugar for the entire mix which will do several 10# batches of sausage:

Originally posted by drinks drinks wrote:

It is hard to beat the basic german/czech sausage made in central Texas

I use 10 lb of meat. the simplest way I know to get a good blend is to just buy boston butts on sale, debone and grind.

I take a cup of tenderquick, add 1/4 cup sugar, 1/4 cup black pepper, 2 TBSP of garlic powder and 1 TBSP of ground cayenne.

I mix 8 TBSP of it with 10 lb of meat, grind once. case and cure at least 3 days then my choice of smoke at 170-180 degrees for 4-5 hours.

I like my sausage to have a texture , so I use the 8mm plate on my grinder.


You may want to add a little more black pepper to the basic mix recipe, say add 2 more TBSP to the 4TBSP (1/4C) it calls for.

Originally posted by grouchobear grouchobear wrote:

One thing I haven't done is to smoke the sausage.  A question about this.  While I do have an offset smoker that I love use, I don't have a "cure box".  Can the sausage be cured by just putting it in the fridge?  Also, since smoking takes quite a bit of time as does the actual sausage making.  Can the sausage cure for more than the 3 days?  Ideally I'd like to make the sausage on a Sunday afternoon and let it cure until the next weekend when I have a whole day to work the smoker.


Ron's advice about cold smoking and hot cooking is spot on. I strongly suggest you hot smoke at about 180*-225*F until you get an internal temp of 165*. That will take several hours. Like drinks says in his recipe, cure the sausage for 3 days in a refrigerator. Your offset smoker will be just great for hot smoke cooking. Cold smoke curing is a whole different set of rules and equipment.

Dave's sausage making tutorial is great info too. Check it out. I wish I'd had access to it when I first started making sausage years ago.

My first episode was with Mother and Dad when I was 15 or so back in the mid -60's. We had a devil of a time getting the sausage into the casing until Mom snapped and slid the casing up over the stuffing tube first. What idiots we felt like, after we had smashed and squeezed that sausage down several feet of casing BY HAND to get it to the other end.EmbarrassedLOL


Let your light shine
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 September 2018 at 10:22
Hi, Jeff, and welcome to the forum. We're glad to have you here and hope to see more of you, so feel free to look around and jump into any topic that strikes your fancy.

I'm also glad that you got some use from this topic, as I STILL need to get moving and get some made - hopefully this year...with my youngest son being a teenager now, I've been pretty busy.

I think your instincts are good in cutting the sugar by half. These things are always subjective, of course, because some like a little more this or that than others; also, as you have learned, grandkids and great-grandkids sometimes don't have much to go on in terms of "recipes" when it comes to these things. To me, there are also a couple of other factors: 1) tastes have changed over the years, and what might have been considered normal or good in days gone by is different from today. Also, 2) I think sometimes when scaling up or down, some ingredients (spices, sugar, etc.) might not scale as smoothly as we hope, so tweaking seems almost always necessary.

This is my very long way of saying that I think your instincts are spot on where this is concerned. Please do give it a try, and let us know what the results are, so that it can all be added to the collective knowledge!

Regarding your question on smoking the sausage: assuming you are talking about cold smoking, I personally don't think you will run into any problems if you make the sausage on a Sunday, keep it chilled, and then smoke it the next weekend. I would recommend hanging the sausage or setting it out on racks so that it "dries" a bit before smoking; at least over-night, but longer isn't going to really hurt anything. Keep in mind that this is cold smoking, as opposed to hot smoke-cooking; so while you can definitely smoke the sausage in your offset, you will want a cool or cold source of smoke.

On the other hand, if you intend to smoke cook your sausage, I say go ahead and smoke it hot at normal temps (about 250 degrees or so).

You can learn more here using Dave's excellent tutorial on the subject:

http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/sausage-making-for-the-beginner_topic2903.html

If you have any further questions, be sure to ask them, and we will get them answered for you. Dave has been making sausage for quite a while, and he is very good at it!

Ron
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
grouchobear View Drop Down
Scullery Servant
Scullery Servant
Avatar

Joined: 17 September 2018
Location: Fresno
Status: Offline
Points: 1
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote grouchobear Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 September 2018 at 09:43
First of all, thanks to all who have posted recipes and comments in this forum, it has been very helpful.

I've been looking for a recipe for German Sausage for a while now and was really happy to find this. While I'm not German or Russian or ethnic Mennonite I do attend a MB church in the central valley of CA. I asked everyone I could find for a recipe and no one has one. Everyone talks about how their grandparents used to make it but it seems that writing down the recipe just isn't in the MB DNA.

I've made the original recipe (scaled down to 10lbs) a couple of time now. While it is really good it's just not quite what I'm after. I've added the sugar both times and the sausage just tastes a little on the sweet side. I'm going to try and reduce the sugar by 1/2 next time to see if that gets me closer to what I'm familiar with.

One thing I haven't done is to smoke the sausage. A question about this. While I do have an offset smoker that I love to use, I don't have a "cure box". Can the sausage be cured by just putting it in the fridge? Also, since smoking takes quite a bit of time as does the actual sausage making. Can the sausage cure for more than the 3 days? Ideally I'd like to make the sausage on a Sunday afternoon and let it cure until the next weekend when I have a whole day to work the smoker.

Thanks in advance for any tips and thanks again for this forum.
-jeff bryant
Back to Top
Olyeller View Drop Down
Scullery Servant
Scullery Servant
Avatar

Joined: 17 February 2018
Location: Texas
Status: Offline
Points: 11
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Olyeller Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 February 2018 at 18:13
Many thanks to drinks and Tas. The German/Czech sausage recipe here is exactly what I've been looking for.

Made 5 pounds today using Boston Butt....perfection in a casing. Hug It could not have been better.

Thanks again.


Let your light shine
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 February 2018 at 08:54
I really need to dip into sausage-making more often - I'm glad you like the German/Czech recipe!

If you're looking for something a little more Slavic, here's a great recipe for Slovak sausage:

http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/domce-den-klobsy_topic4136.html

And if you want something really unique and special, here's another Slovak specialty:

http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/jaternica-also-known-as-hurka_topic3938.html
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Olyeller View Drop Down
Scullery Servant
Scullery Servant
Avatar

Joined: 17 February 2018
Location: Texas
Status: Offline
Points: 11
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Olyeller Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 February 2018 at 17:11
I've been looking for a great German/Czech sausage recipe for years and have found the Mother Lode. Thanks Ron and drinks.

drinks is right on about using Boston Butt for sausage meat, and also about the HEB "Carnitas" trimming. I use either with venison to make my deer sausages.

I also have Great Sausage Recipes and Meat Curing by Rytek Kutas, 3rd Edition, which has been called the sausage bible. Great source of sausage-making and meat curing info.
Let your light shine
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 November 2017 at 15:07
Sounds great - I am glad that you're making it work!

If anyone would like to take look at another sausage with more than a bit of Germans from Russia heritage, here's truly great one, from a wurstmeister who really knows his stuff:

Manitoba Farmers Sausage

Also, for those who use Morton's TenderQuick (or Mad Hunky's TennerQuack) for curing and smoking sausage, here is the "Basic German Sausage" recipe, scaled to 5 pounds and using TQ at the rate of 1.5 teaspoons per pound:

Quote German Sausage (details above) - 5-pound batch (by volume), with TenderQuick as a curing agent:

Morton's TenderQuick - 7.5 teaspoons
Salt - 1.25 teaspoons
Black Pepper - 3 teaspoons (1 tablespoon)
Garlic Powder - 3/4 teaspoon
Ground Pork - 3.75 pounds
Ground Beef - 1.25 pounds
Brown Sugar (optional) - 6 teaspoons (2 tablespoons)


Mixing the curing agent and spices into a slurry is always a good idea, so that the cure and spices are distributed evenly and that the sausage is easier to handle after curing. Water is commonly used; but in this case, beer might be the way to go.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
lachaffin View Drop Down
Scullery Servant
Scullery Servant


Joined: 24 September 2015
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Status: Offline
Points: 2
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lachaffin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 January 2016 at 07:53
Wow, so impressed with all the great comments and suggestions.

I have now made two batches and each gets a little better. I also bought a combination grinder/stuffer which is okay, but I can see where a vertical is on the list soon.

Thanks everyone, and I'll be back.
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 September 2015 at 06:43
Welcome, lachaffin!

It's great to see you here, and I look forward to more discussions on this. The recipe that I "converted" above has not been tried yet by me, but a fellow that I know in Kansas did give it a try and pronounced it to be excellent.

The advice provided by Don (drinks) is good wisdom - sausage can be made from pretty much anything, and the fat content is a matter of preference and practicality, from what I can see.

A sausage stuffer is definitely preferred, but not 100% necessary to get started. When I started, I made good sausage stuffing from the grinder, but it does require some care. There are many stuffing alternatives, but if you do this much, you will most likely want to get a stuffer. Mine is a 5-pound vertical stuffer from LEM, and I am very, very happy with it.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
drinks View Drop Down
Chef's Apprentice
Chef's Apprentice


Joined: 19 September 2014
Location: male
Status: Offline
Points: 372
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drinks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 September 2015 at 12:34
I make a batch of the German/Czech sausage several times a year.

Yes, 8 tbsp per 10 lb meat is what I use.

As you get into sausage making, you shall learn there is no one recipe. If you want leaner sausage, use more beef...if you want really lean, use chicken or turkey.

I like boston butt for at least 2 reasons: first, HEB usually has it on sale for $1 a lb at least every 3-4 weeks. Second, it has about the amount of lean and fat I like, roughly, 80/20.

Now and then they even have vacuum bags of "Pork for Carnitas" which is boneless boston butt for $1-1.50 a lb.

I have made all beef, all turkey, (not my choice meat), all chicken,same as turkey, even a fish/pork blend, not very good.

If you are really interested, go on Amazon.com and order a copy of the book, "Great Sausage Recipes", by Anton Kusac.

After a few times of reading it, you should have very few questions about sausage making.

If you expect to get serious, get a good grinder and a vertical stuffer, stuffing from a grinder is not very good. The sausage comes out very similar to store bought hot dogs.
Back to Top
lachaffin View Drop Down
Scullery Servant
Scullery Servant


Joined: 24 September 2015
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Status: Offline
Points: 2
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lachaffin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 September 2015 at 12:04
I'm a newbie to sausage making and did my first stuffing last week. It wasn't the best but it was okay. My wife is from North Dakota, where her parents made their own sausage - but no one really had a recipe, they just added this and added that - but omg it's by far the best.

So, what I'm doing is searching for a German Sausage recipe that would be similar to what I have eaten made by her Russian/German immigrants. This recipe looks fantastic.

Drinks, when you mention mixing 8 TBSP of it - is that the total mixture of all the ingredients for 10 lbs? Please excuse my ignorance of being a new guy.

Thanks in advance for your comments.
Back to Top
drinks View Drop Down
Chef's Apprentice
Chef's Apprentice


Joined: 19 September 2014
Location: male
Status: Offline
Points: 372
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drinks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 July 2015 at 15:00
It is hard to beat the basic german/czech sausage made in central Texas

I use 10 lb of meat. the simplest way I know to get a good blend is to just buy boston butts on sale, debone and grind.

I take a cup of tenderquick, add 1/4 cup sugar, 1/4 cup black pepper, 2 TBSP of garlic powder and 1 TBSP of ground cayenne.

I mix 8 TBSP of it with 10 lb of meat, grind once. case and cure at least 3 days then my choice of smoke at 170-180 degrees for 4-5 hours.

I like my sausage to have a texture , so I use the 8mm plate on my grinder.
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.156 seconds.