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Ottoman Cuisine--An Introduction

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    Posted: 15 April 2017 at 19:16
Dan, you're absolutely right about Ripart's Black Sea Bass with Port. It's with good reason it was his signature dish at Le Bernadin for many years.

I don't make it often, because of the cost of seabass, and it's one of the very few recipes in which I refuse to make substitutions.

One thing I learned from it was the benefit of a double reduction (i.e., reducing one liquid then adding the second and reducing it). I've tried it, once, with a single reduction and there's a subtle but noticeable loss. I've adapted the technique to other recipes, and it does make a difference.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 April 2017 at 16:09

Gentlemen, 

Eastern Mediterranean Fish Varieties in the Greek / Turkey Region Include:

1)  Gilt Bream
2)  Denton
3)  Meagre - also known as:   Corvina
4)  Grey Mullet ( Prized by the Greeks for its Taramasalata ):   It is made with Grey Mullet in Greece.




***  COD:  Newfoundland, Norway, Iceland, Greenland, Sweden, Arctic Circle of Alaska ..
They do not have an affinity for warmer waters. 


I am sure there are more, however, I have to go through my Book:   Alan Davidson Series

THE TIO PEPE GUIDE TO SEAFOOD ..

The names of the fish are in 7 languages too plus the LATIN NAME OF THE SPECIES:  English, French, Spanish, Basque, Catalan, Galician and Portuguese.   There is a series of these books ..   And  they are published by:  Santana Books.

I would check to see if any of Alan Davidson´s books are on Amazon.

Turkey is a large producer of Almonds.  They are delicate .. 

Hope this has been of some help.  

ALSO, 1 MORE THING, PERHAPS YOU CAN CHECK ON SUBS for these types of fish and see what you come up with.  Google Mediterranean Fish in Turkey ..






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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 April 2017 at 09:11
    Ron, Brook, Margi...

   Nice recipe, I'll certainly be giving it a try at some point.  Not sure if I'll make it as written or come up with any substitutions at the time of preparation.  Interesting thoughts on consistency and flavors of nuts, etc.  I'll have to see how it comes together and what I have available at the time.  I could see how a fine hazelnut powder would take all the moisture out.  One possible solution may be to add just a bit of finely chopped hazelnut to make the sauce, then top the dish with the remaining before serving.

    Brook, you mention Eric Ripart's Black Sea Bass with Port.  I've made that recipe a few times I'm I'm always amazed at the great balance/flow of flavors.  It is certainly worth spending the extra money, if able, on black sea bass.  This is one of the few recipes I usually follow exactly.







Originally posted by TasunkaWitko TasunkaWitko wrote:

Originally posted by I I wrote:

Brook shared a recipe with me for Turkish Sea Bass with Garlic-Hazelnut Sauce; it looked incredible, so I decided to give it a try and was not disappointed. Due to cost and availability, I substituted cod fillets for the sea bass, and it worked very well. This dish looked and tasted like something belonging in a fine-dining restaurant, yet was incredibly easy - and healthy.


I completely forgot to follow up on this - mea culpa!

This really was good, and I learned quite a bit about Ottoman and Turkish flavor profiles by trying it. I would heartily recommend it to anyone who wants to try a good fish dish...or someone who wants to dive into the world of Ottoman cuisine.

Quote Turkish Sea Bass with Hazelnut Garlic Sauce

5 sea bass filets, skinless (I substituted cod)
Water
1 teaspoon salt                                          
1 recipe hazelnut garlic sauce (below)
Chopped parsley

Poach fish in salted water for 15 minutes and align them on a serving plate.

Serve fish with the sauce. Sprinkle with chopped parsley      


Hazlenut Garlic Sauce

2 oz hazelnuts
2 garlic cloves
Crumbs from 2 slices bread (1 cup)
1 teaspoons salt
1/3 cup water                                      
2 tablespoons vinegar
Juice of one lemon
4 tablespoons olive oil
Minced parsley for garnish

Grind hazelnuts, garlic, bread, and salt in a mortar. Transfer to a mixing bowl, add water, vinegar, lemon juice, and olive oil and mix well.

5 servings


For the benefit of those who are reading this, I will post some notes that I took on this dish, as well as Brook's replies:

Originally posted by I I wrote:

....Also, we had the Turkish Sea Bass with Hazelnut Garlic Sauce (using cod as a substitute) for supper. The dish looked nice - restaurant quality - and tasted great.

Two small execution problems:

1. We used just a bit too much salt on the cod (I actually liked it that way, but someone else eating it would probably have pointed it out).

2. The sauce seemed a lot thicker than I expected it to be, almost like cookie dough in texture. I am guessing not enough liquid or too many hazelnuts.

Also, The Beautiful Mrs. Tas wasn't fond of the hazelnut flavor, saying that the nuts tasted stale to her, but she very much liked the dish otherwise. Maybe next time, we'll try almonds (which should still adhere to the Ottoman theme) or walnuts - maybe even peanuts, although that will take it out of Istanbul. But now that I think about it, cod probably does, as well.

Having said that, I really liked all of the flavours that were in there, which went wonderfully together. Great-tasting, and healthy, to boot. It was not only easy, but it also looked like a high-dollar dining experience. Looking forward to having it again.


And Brook's reply:

Originally posted by Brook Brook wrote:

My bad! I’d also thought the sauce was too thick. Should have mentioned that, but it slipped my mind. Thinning it down, next time, would be a good idea.

It’s always a good idea, with hazelnuts, to pan-toast them before using, in order to reawaken the oils, and intensify their natural flavor. They tend to sit on store shelves longer than is good for them. I don’t know if “stale” is exactly the right word. But “dry” and “dusty” are certainly not remiss. Otherwise, I agree that almonds would be a good substitute. So would Brazil nuts, I think---although they weren’t known to the Ottomans. Peanuts, to my mind, are a bit of a stretch. While the finished dish might be good, it would be too far from the Ottoman mode, IMO.

So far as cod; why not? True, it’s not exactly Ottoman in nature. What fish and seafood they ate came mostly from the Black Sea. But sea bass takes a second mortgage, nowadays. And, flavorwise, doesn’t contribute enough to a dish like this to make up for the high cost. For something like Eric Ripart’s signature Black Bass with Port, I’m willing to bite the economic bullet. But not for this dish, in which the sauce is actually the key element. Mahi Mahi goes on and off sale around here. That might be a nice alternative as well.


In all, this was seriously good, and deserves a shot. With Lent coming up, it might be a good time to try it!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 April 2017 at 14:42
Brook,

Removing the hazelnut skins is a wise idea.

Tend to be a bit bitter if not eliminated. 

Also would love to do this recipe too ..  ( the fish with hazelnuts )

All is closed here due to Holy  Week but next week I shall copy down in a note book your 2 recipes and go to Central Main Market which is where the Farmer´s Market is  too .. 

Have a wonderful holiday ..

Ron:   Have a fabulous holiday too !! 





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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 April 2017 at 08:19
That might have been it right there, Brook - I'll be sure to keep that in mind, next time.

Thanks!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 April 2017 at 06:36
Thanks for the kind words, Margi. The stuffed chicken is an amazing riff on chicken rolls.

We moved the Rhodian fish cakes recipe to the Sephardic thread, which is where it belonged in the first place. So, if you go looking for it, there it be.

Ron: Something I should have mentioned before, but just occurred to me re: the fish in hazelnut sauce. A lot of the "stale" flavor comes from not removing the skins from the nuts. My fault, as I just assume it's something cooks do automatically. Easiest way is to pan toast the nuts, then, when they're cool enough to handle, rub them together vigorously. That will loosen the skins and you can discard them. For "discard" read, "add to the compost pile."
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2017 at 12:19
Brook  & Ron,

The recipes are absolutely amazing.  I am very interested in the stuffed Chicken breasts ..

Thank you for taking the time to post them here.

Happy Holidays Gentlemen ...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 January 2017 at 14:35
Originally posted by Brook Brook wrote:

TURKISH CHICKEN BREASTS STUFFED WITH RICE, PISTACHIOS & HERBS
(Pilic Sarmasi)

For the stuffing:     
1/4 cup pistachios     
3 tbls clarified butter
2 tbls chopped shallot     
1 cup short-grained rice
1.5 cups chicken stock     
1 large tomato, peeled, seeded, chopped
2 tbls fresh mint, minced     
2 tbls fresh parsley, minced
3 tbls fresh dill, minced

For the chicken:     
6 boneless, skinless, breasts     
Salt & pepper to taste
2 tbls butter     
2 tbls shallot, chopped fine
2 med tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and chopped
1 tbls dill, chopped fine     
1/4 cup dry white wine
1 tbls fresh parsley, chopped fine

Blanch pistachios for 1 minute. Rinse in cold water. Rub to remove skins. Set aside

Preheat oven to 350F.

Make the stuffing: Melt the butter in a heavy saucepan over medium heat. Add the shallots and rice, and cook gently, stirring, to coat them evenly with the butter, about a minute. Add the stock, bring to boil, lower heat, and simmer, covered, for about 15 minutes until liquid is absorbed.

Remove the saucepan from the heat and add the tomato, pistachios, mint, parsley and dill. Mix well and set stuffing aside.

Flatten breasts slightly with a mallet. Season with salt and pepper. Place each breast on a square of parchment. Spoon 2 heaping tablespoons of stuffing in center of each breast. Gently roll up the parchment to enclose the chicken breasts, securing both ends with twine. Place breasts side by side in a baking dish. Bake for about 45 minutes, turning halfway through baking.

Meanwhile, melt butter in a small skillet. Stir in the shallots and cook 1 minute. Add the tomatoes, dill, salt and pepper. Mash with a fork or potato masher until tomatoes form a puree. Add the wine and cook another 2 minutes. Remove from heat and keep warm.

Unwrap the breasts and cut each into thick slices. Spoon the sauce onto warmed plates and place sliced chicken on top. Sprinkle with parsley and serve warm.


We tried this dish as well, and I was again impressed with how easy these Turkish dishes were, especially considering the huge returns in flavor and presentation. Not only did this dish look like the proverbial Million Bucks on the plate, it also was tasted incredible!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 January 2017 at 14:25
Originally posted by I I wrote:

Brook shared a recipe with me for Turkish Sea Bass with Garlic-Hazelnut Sauce; it looked incredible, so I decided to give it a try and was not disappointed. Due to cost and availability, I substituted cod fillets for the sea bass, and it worked very well. This dish looked and tasted like something belonging in a fine-dining restaurant, yet was incredibly easy - and healthy.


I completely forgot to follow up on this - mea culpa!

This really was good, and I learned quite a bit about Ottoman and Turkish flavor profiles by trying it. I would heartily recommend it to anyone who wants to try a good fish dish...or someone who wants to dive into the world of Ottoman cuisine.

Quote Turkish Sea Bass with Hazelnut Garlic Sauce

5 sea bass filets, skinless (I substituted cod)
Water
1 teaspoon salt                                          
1 recipe hazelnut garlic sauce (below)
Chopped parsley

Poach fish in salted water for 15 minutes and align them on a serving plate.

Serve fish with the sauce. Sprinkle with chopped parsley      


Hazlenut Garlic Sauce

2 oz hazelnuts
2 garlic cloves
Crumbs from 2 slices bread (1 cup)
1 teaspoons salt
1/3 cup water                                      
2 tablespoons vinegar
Juice of one lemon
4 tablespoons olive oil
Minced parsley for garnish

Grind hazelnuts, garlic, bread, and salt in a mortar. Transfer to a mixing bowl, add water, vinegar, lemon juice, and olive oil and mix well.

5 servings


For the benefit of those who are reading this, I will post some notes that I took on this dish, as well as Brook's replies:

Originally posted by I I wrote:

....Also, we had the Turkish Sea Bass with Hazelnut Garlic Sauce (using cod as a substitute) for supper. The dish looked nice - restaurant quality - and tasted great.

Two small execution problems:

1. We used just a bit too much salt on the cod (I actually liked it that way, but someone else eating it would probably have pointed it out).

2. The sauce seemed a lot thicker than I expected it to be, almost like cookie dough in texture. I am guessing not enough liquid or too many hazelnuts.

Also, The Beautiful Mrs. Tas wasn't fond of the hazelnut flavor, saying that the nuts tasted stale to her, but she very much liked the dish otherwise. Maybe next time, we'll try almonds (which should still adhere to the Ottoman theme) or walnuts - maybe even peanuts, although that will take it out of Istanbul. But now that I think about it, cod probably does, as well.

Having said that, I really liked all of the flavours that were in there, which went wonderfully together. Great-tasting, and healthy, to boot. It was not only easy, but it also looked like a high-dollar dining experience. Looking forward to having it again.


And Brook's reply:

Originally posted by Brook Brook wrote:

My bad! I’d also thought the sauce was too thick. Should have mentioned that, but it slipped my mind. Thinning it down, next time, would be a good idea.

It’s always a good idea, with hazelnuts, to pan-toast them before using, in order to reawaken the oils, and intensify their natural flavor. They tend to sit on store shelves longer than is good for them. I don’t know if “stale” is exactly the right word. But “dry” and “dusty” are certainly not remiss. Otherwise, I agree that almonds would be a good substitute. So would Brazil nuts, I think---although they weren’t known to the Ottomans. Peanuts, to my mind, are a bit of a stretch. While the finished dish might be good, it would be too far from the Ottoman mode, IMO.

So far as cod; why not? True, it’s not exactly Ottoman in nature. What fish and seafood they ate came mostly from the Black Sea. But sea bass takes a second mortgage, nowadays. And, flavorwise, doesn’t contribute enough to a dish like this to make up for the high cost. For something like Eric Ripart’s signature Black Bass with Port, I’m willing to bite the economic bullet. But not for this dish, in which the sauce is actually the key element. Mahi Mahi goes on and off sale around here. That might be a nice alternative as well.


In all, this was seriously good, and deserves a shot. With Lent coming up, it might be a good time to try it!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 October 2016 at 16:26
Brook,

In all sincerity, you should write a book or créate a PDF platform magazine.  This is absolutely amazing.

Thank you for posting all of these exceptional historically traditional récipes too ..

To comment on The Roman Influence:

PORT OF CALL KUSADASI ..

KUDASASI, which means "bird island" in Turkish, is the launching off place for a variety of wonders ..

Ephesus was the Captial of the ancient Roman Province and its ruins are among the most extensive and impressive in the world.  In Turkish, this region is called " Efes "..

On that trip, I had bell peppers stuffed with rice and currants, Lamb Börekler, a phyllo pastry dating back to Roman times, of course still served and Turkish Yogurt ..

I had published that article in the 1980s ..

Thank you once again.

All my best regards ..


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 October 2016 at 15:34
Absolutely, Ron. That was the point of my post.

In this case, however, it might not even be national borders that are crossed. There's no doubt in my mind that the Ottoman version included chef-to-chef and household-to-household variations.

I do like the sounds of Lisa's Uzbecki filling, and will give it a go first chance. As with the Ottoman version, I'll likely use red onions rather than the Spanish, cuz I like the looks of finished dish better that way.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 October 2016 at 13:18
As we've often discussed, Brook - the ingredients will often be adapted to local tastes, customs or availability, but the underlying concept and technique will be virtually unchanged.

I often find it interesting to watch how some foods, such as this, travel across whole continents, or even farther....
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 October 2016 at 13:07
If there's any question about the cross-fertilization of cusines, check out this recipe from Panning The Globe: http://www.panningtheglobe.com/2012/11/28/stuffed-onions-from-afghanistan/

Now compare it to my posted recipe for Ottoman stuffed onions above. While there are expected differences in the filling, the technique remains the same.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 October 2016 at 08:17
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Sort of wish you hadn't included the Moorish Blend comments, Ron. They aren't really related. Maybe move them to a more appropriate spot?


Already done, in North Africa!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 October 2016 at 06:25
Sort of wish you hadn't included the Moorish Blend comments, Ron. They aren't really related. Maybe move them to a more appropriate spot?

A note on Saveur's "Stuffed Eggplant" recipe. Imam Bayildi is almost always translated as some variation of "The Imam Swooned." I've seen it as "The Imam Fainted," and "Swooning Imam" as well.

The point is, the name of the dish reflects both the Ottoman chefs' penchant for culinary whimsy, and is a critique of the dish itself. Supposedly, it was so good that in made the Imam swoon with pleasure when he tasted it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 September 2016 at 16:04
This topic is always a favourite one of discussion between Brook and myself. Ottoman cuisine is such a nexus of different, varied cultures because the Empire was so far-flung and long-lived, that two foodies could correspond for a lifetime about it and probably only scratch the surface.

I receive a "Recipe of the Day" each morning from Saveur Magazine in my email inbox. The recipes that Saveur sends - especially the "peasant recipes" - are often "cheffed up" to the point where they would probably be barely recognizable to the people and cultures that made them famous, but there are almost always some great ideas there, and they make for some good brainstorming. Best of all, I am often afforded an opportunity to gain quite a bit of wisdom and lore from Brook, as he relates what he knows and has learned about the subject at hand.

Not long ago, I received one that featured Turkish cuisine; it looked pretty darn good to me, and featured a variety of dishes that fit the profile. As is often my practice, I forwarded it along to Brook.

The star of the newsletter was a recipe for Turkish Lamb Dumplings from Ana Sortun called Manti:

http://www.saveur.com/turkish-lamb-manti-dumplings-recipe

There were other recipes, including Imam Bayildi (Stuffed Eggplant):

http://www.saveur.com/turkish-stuffed-eggplant-imam-bayildi-recipe

Lahmacun (Flatbread with Lamb and Tomatoes):

http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Flat-Bread-with-Lamb-and-Tomatoes-lahmacun

And 10 other recipes, most of which looked incredible:

http://www.saveur.com/best-turkish-recipes

The links above should give you a window to some really good (and usually easier than you'd think) recipes.

Back to the Manti, Brook sent a reply that really elaborated on the subject, providing a lot of good information that I'd like to share here:

Originally posted by Brook Brook wrote:

Hey, Ron,

Not a bad Manti recipe. But it’s what you’d expect from Ana Sortun.

If there’s any criticism it would have to do with their size. Turkish Manti are, intentionally, made tiny. The smaller they are, the greater the respect for the guest. Given that Ana is an American restaurateur, and that Americans think of stuffed dumplings in terms of ravioli and won ton, it’s understandable that she makes them that large.

Manti (also called “Mantou”) are universal among Turkic peoples, and can be found, in one form or another, from eastern Russia, Armenia, and Ukraine all the way to the Far East. Generally attributed to the Mongols, who brought them westward along the Silk Road, there is some evidence that they actually followed the opposite path; that is, they originated in the western part of the Mongol empire, and were carried eastward.

Two things mark the differences among various people within that area: Size of the dumplings, and how they are cooked. In Turkey, manti are usually baked or boiled (sometimes both). In most of the rest of the Turkic world they are boiled, or, more usually, steamed. In Russia, for instance, steaming is the only way. And special, stackable metal steamers, are used. Picture bamboo steamers made of metal and you get the idea.

You know I usually have little use for wikipedia; but, this time, they have a fine write-up about manti, almost encyclopedic in nature:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manti_(dumpling)

For what is, perhaps, a better view of shaping and cooking manti than the Saveur site, the Panning The Globe blogsite is hard to beat:

http://www.panningtheglobe.com/2013/11/05/turkish-manti/

Note that in this version the finished dumplings are significantly smaller than Sortun’s version (2-inch squares, vs. 3-inch). If you use area as the criteria, they are less than half the size.

For an even more traditional view, check out Ozlem Warren’s site:

http://ozlemsturkishtable.com/2013/12/manti-the-tiny-treasuresturkish-dumplings-stuffed-with-ground-meat-in-garlic-yoghurt-and-spices/

Read carefully, and you’ll find that he starts with squares that are only 1 x 1 inch. This is certainly more in keeping with how they’d be made in Turkey. Ana Sortun’s are more in keeping with Anatolian types, which are much larger.

If somebody was going to try these for the first time, my advice would be to go with the larger ones. Not only are they easier to stuff and form, but commercial won ton wrappers could substitute. I’d also recommend, this time of year in particular, that they go with a Uzbeki style, which combines the lamb with pumpkin as well as onions.

Brook


As you can see, a veritable treasure trove of information, just right there; however, the German/Russian inside me immediately latched onto the last paragraph, with the description of the Uzbeki style. They reminded me of Blachinda (also known as Plachinda), which are a savory, pumpkin-filled pastry (think of it almost as a turnover) that is ubiquitous to Germans-from-Russian cuisine:

http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/german-blachinda_topic4292.html

This cuisine borrows heavily from the Ottoman Empire, not only from regions around Turkey, but also from lands in Eastern Europe that felt the yoke of Turkish conquest; indeed, many Germans who settled in the Russian empire later brought cultural and ethnic traits to America - including foodways - that were so Turkish in nature that their immigrant cousins from Wurzburg, Hannover and Berlin looked at them askance, referring to them as, "those other Germans."

I mentioned this similarity to Brook, and it wasn't long before he sent back a very good comparison, along with a side-trip to the development of an incredible-looking seasoning blend, as well:

Originally posted by Brook Brook wrote:

That was my immediate thought, as well.

A couple of differences, though. The Placinda are, comparatively, gigantic. They’d be on the large size for Manti---even the Anatolian version. And the Plachinda are boiled, or sometimes fried. The Russian version of Manti is always steamed.

The big difference, however, is that Manti always contain meat. Usually lamb, but often beef. A meat stuffing practically defines them, though. The Pumpkin Plachinda are completely vegetarian.

One could do an incredible culinary journey exploring the variations on the Manti theme. Most of the time (Russian is different), the name is an obvious ethnic variation on Mantou. So, anytime you see that when exploring an ethic or regional cuisine, you know exactly what it is.

You remember my post on Squid with Moorish Flavors?

http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/squid-with-moorish-flavors_topic4542.html

I’ve been doing that with chicken, and it works out terrific. Because I first envisioned it as snacks, I cut chicken breasts into fingers; about the size and shape of tenders, or a bit larger. This get dusted in seasoned flour, then in eggs beaten with a few glugs of Franks, then breaded with the Moorish mix.

Originally I was shallow frying them. But deep frying seems to work better. Do them in batches, at 350-375F for eight minutes, and they come out perfect.

No reason this wouldn’t work with whole breasts.

Here’s the recipe I’ve developed:

Moorish Blend

1.5 cups ground almonds
1 cup garbanzo flour (or mixed garbanzo and fava bean)
1 tbls smoked paprika
2 tsp salt
2 tbls coriander seed*
2 tsp peppercorns*
2 tsp allspice berries*
Zest of one lime

*toasted and ground

Combine all ingredients until well blended. Use as a breading on chicken and seafood.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 April 2016 at 07:13
I don't see any problem using cod, Ron. In general, the Ottoman's did not use a lot of fish or seafood. What they did came mostly from the Black Sea. And was eaten primarily in Istanbul and environs.

But, had their conquests continued further westward they'd have been exposed to more fishes, including cod, which was a mainstay of Iberia and western Europe.

Given their penchant for adopting new foods, I have no doubt cod, particularly salt cod, would have become a staple.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2016 at 18:04
Hey, Mike - I'm sure that Brook will have a little more to post on this in the near future - he and I have been discussing it quite a bit via email correspondence, and it truly is a fascinating cuisine - I can't even imagine how far or in how many directions Ottoman cuisine has influenced other cultures, but it wouldn't surprise me to see vestiges of it in Austria, across North Africa, in Iran and India, and even in Russia, via the Black Sea and Crimea. The ways that Turkish influences can be seen across the Old World could easily fill a book, or a scholar's thesis.

Brook shared a recipe with me for Turkish Sea Bass with Garlic-Hazelnut Sauce; it looked incredible, so I decided to give it a try and was not disappointed. Due to cost and availability, I substituted cod fillets for the sea bass, and it worked very well. This dish looked and tasted like something belonging in a fine-dining restaurant, yet was incredibly easy - and healthy.

I have the recipe as well as some notes on it - I'll try to get them posted tonight or tomorrow. Also, sometime this week, we will hopefully be trying the chicken breasts stuffed with rice and pistachios (posted above), along with a side dish or two, if we can.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 March 2016 at 11:12
Don't take my lack of responses as disinterest, please! I would very much like to delve into this subject, but alas my life is sort of hectic of late and I hardly have time to even read these in-depth posts, much less try them, or provide input. But I very much want to! Please do continue if you would, your work does not go unnoticed or unappreciated. 
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Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 March 2016 at 08:57
SOURCE INFORMATION

When I began this project I fully expected a lot of input by the members; not only because of the subject itself, but because of the influence Ottoman cuisine had on so many others. Anyone with a culinary interest in any part of the Med, or the Mid-East, or even central and eastern Europe, would, I thought, be interested in one of the major roots of those cuisines.

Apparently, I was wrong. Rather than becoming one of the more in-depth and free-ranging discussions at Foods of the World, there has been very little interest shown. Disappointing, to say the least. I’ve concluded that continuing this project, here, is mostly a waste of time.

Certainly I’ll continue my study, because the topic is so fascinating, on so many levels. And, it goes without saying, I’ll continue experimenting with Ottoman and Turkish recipes and flavors. But I see no reason to keep on typing my findings for a disinterested audience. So I’m not continuing the thread.

However, I always acknowledge my sources. So will conclude with a listing of where I found much of the information.

As usual, the internet is a great resource. But not as useful, this time, as you might think. Most of the info available deals with modern Turkish cooking, with some references to this or that recipe having come down from the Ottomans. So I relied more heavily on books. Among them:

500 Years of Ottoman Cuisine, Marianna Yerasimos, Sally Bradbrook, translator, IV (English) edition, Boyut Publishing, Istanbul, 2015

Ottoman Cuisine: A rich Culinary Tradition, M. Omur Akkor, Blue Dome Press, New York, 2014

The Art of Turkish Cooking, Neset Eren, Doubleday & Co., New York, 1969

The Sultan’s Kitchen, Ozcan Ozan, Periplus Editions, Boston, 1998

A Taste of Turkish Cuisine, Nur Ilkin and Sheilah Kaufman, Hippocrene Books, New York, 2007

The Turkish Cookbook: Regional Recipes and Stories, Nur Ilkin and Sheilah Kaufman, Interlink Books, Northampton, MA, 2010

From Tapas To Mezze,” Joanne Weir, Ten Speed Press, Berkeley, CA, 2004

Mezze Modern, Maria Khalife, Interlink Books, Northampton, MA, 2008


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And sae the Lord be thanket
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