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Fish and Chips

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thejellyfishbar View Drop Down
Scullery Servant
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote thejellyfishbar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Fish and Chips
    Posted: Yesterday at 06:52
Wow! fish and chips. Great recipe. I will going to add this recipe on my seafood restaurant menu. Thanku.
https://www.thejellyfishbar.com/ - best sushi in orange beach
https://www.thejellyfishbar.com/about-us/ - fish steak restaurant
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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 November 2018 at 15:13
Here's a good article from BBC on the 150th anniversary of Fish and Chips in the UK in 2009:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8419026.stm

And here is a listing of recipes for Fish and Chips, also from the BBC:

https://www.bbc.com/food/fish_and_chips
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 December 2014 at 11:45
Marcus Samuelsson's take on Fish and Chips:

Quote Fish and Chips with Fried Pickles

(Photo by Paul Brissman

In 1860, Joseph Malin, a Jewish immigrant from Eastern Europe, started the first fish and chips shop in London’s East End. There are now well over 8,000 fish and chips shops in Britain. I think fish and chips taste better when you’re eating them near a body of water – on the beach with a beer it’s the perfect snack. Most dishes don’t need that backdrop. Otherwise, the only other place where I want fish and chips is in a British pub watching a football game. In the U.K., fish and chips are usually served with salt and vinegar. Here, I serve them with a tarragon malt vinegar mayonnaise and fried pickles. When you’re grocery shopping for this recipe, if you can’t find halibut, or would prefer to use some other fish, you can substitute cod, haddock, or whiting for delicious results.

Recipe:

http://www.marcussamuelsson.com/recipe/fish-and-chips-with-fried-pickles

Marcus Samuelsson's new book, Marcus Off Duty, is available here:

http://www.marcussamuelsson.com/chef-2/marcus-off-duty-the-recipes-i-cook-at-home
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 April 2011 at 09:12
hey, hey - i thought this might make a good footnote for this thread:
 
my #3 son, billy, is in the school choir, and for their festival this year they are singing The Codfish Shanty; here are the lyrics:
 
Quote Glo'ster girls they have no combs,
Heave away, heave away!
They comb their hair with codfish bones,
We're bound for South Australia.

Heave away, my bully bully boys,
Heave away, heave away!
Heave away, why don't you make a noise?
We're bound for South Australia.


Glo'ster boys they have no sleds,
Heave away, heave away!
They slide down hill on codfish heads.
We're bound for South Australia.
 
Heave away, heave away! Heave away boys!

from there, the lyrics can go in a lot of directions...

and here's a video - it's not of my son's ensemble, but it will give you an idea of how it sounds.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kiwi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 October 2010 at 23:09
I'd go a porter or a red over a stout, actually. Other than that, just increase the ratio of beer to other wets, but this will make a 'heavier' batter, not as light and bubbly.
kai time!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 October 2010 at 22:03

normally i would say to use the stoutest beer you can find, but guinness should be exactly the thing to take care of that, so i don't know for sure! i think doubling the beer wouldn't accomplish anything because you would have to double the dry ingredients as well, and then you'd be back where you started. only other thing i can think of is maybe "marinate" the fish fillets in beer for a few hours prior to battering and frying?

perhaps some beer batter experts out there may have a suggestion?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote solaryellow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 October 2010 at 21:54
Originally posted by TasunkaWitko TasunkaWitko wrote:

hey, solar -

glad that you tried it and liked it! i've noticed making beer breads and pizza dough with beer etc. that there isn't as much beer flavour as i would expect. i figure that it blends and gets lost in there a bit among the wheat in the flour, but i am not sure.

Any thoughts on how to increase the beer flavor? Would doubling the amount of beer do the trick?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 October 2010 at 09:01

hey, solar -

glad that you tried it and liked it! i've noticed making beer breads and pizza dough with beer etc. that there isn't as much beer flavour as i would expect. i figure that it blends and gets lost in there a bit among the wheat in the flour, but i am not sure.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote solaryellow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 October 2010 at 22:30
I made this recipe tonight and was very pleased with the final product. I used Guiness Draught for the beer and was a bit disappointed there wasn't more beer flavor but otherwise it was perfect. Thanks for posting it up!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 October 2010 at 07:00
welcome, wannago!
 
those sound like good tips, and i'll be sure to try the rack next time. thanks for posting!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote wannago Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 October 2010 at 05:10
I know that Alton Brown from "Good Eats" says to drain on a rack instead of on paper, and avoid holding in a gas oven to prevent food from being soggy.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 July 2010 at 07:06

my thanks to mrs. gareth! i will gve it a try!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GarethM Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 July 2010 at 02:16
Chip shop haggis is different from ordinary haggis.  It is quiet nice, more like a black pudding with barley added.

My wife suggested keeping them warm by putting them on a baking rack on the bottom shelf of a warm oven.  She also said that (non-fried) pickles were very popular at chip shops near fish quays, so I have learned something new Smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 July 2010 at 12:04
They can deep fry their haggis if they want to. but I still won't eat it! Wink
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 July 2010 at 10:03
the pickles did taste good - certainly something i wouldn't have thought of on my own. scotland and the US must have much in common. i was just hearing the other day about deep-frying marshmallows and twinkies!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GarethM Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 July 2010 at 01:52
Ron,
 
That was a brilliant article.  I nearly went home via the chippy(http://www.qype.co.uk/place/340601-Seashells-Monkseaton) Wink It is always easier to get someone else to worry about the timings!
 
"i had never heard of deep-frying pickles before this week, but i must say it was a good treat."  I have been having fish and chips for 40 years and I had never heard of them (but they do sound interesting).  Also I have never seen a sober person eating a pickled egg in my life.
 
If you go up to Scotland, they have a reputation for deep-frying anything (including mars bars and pizzas).
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 July 2010 at 15:21
It all looks delicious!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 July 2010 at 15:06
hey, andy - yep, i've heard of doing that and will give it a try sometime. the chips came out very well at first, as did the fish and the wallys, but after staying warm in the oven everything got limp and soggy fast. too bad, because the flavours were out of this world!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 July 2010 at 14:17
Ron,
 
One thing I always do when frying chips it to fry them twice.  I soak them in a bowl of cold water then fry them for few minutes at at about 325 degrees until they are sort of limp and soggy then I take them out of the oil and let them cool completely, sometimes even overnight, in the fridge on a cookie sheet then I give them the final frying at 375 degrees until they are golden brown.  Another method which works well is to parboil them for a minute or two then cool and fry a second time in the same manner, parboiling is also much less messy.
 
Cheers,
Andy
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 July 2010 at 15:02
I found an excellent malt vinegar at the market yesterday and brought it home.  Sarson's, it is imported from England.  A Canadian friend who's father is from the UK turned me onto malt vinegar on fish and chips years ago and I've been a fan ever since.




http://www.premierfoods.co.uk/premierfoods/our-brands/grocery/sarsons/en/sarsons_home.cfm

 
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