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Traditional English Roast Beef Supper

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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    Posted: 16 December 2013 at 19:14
Traditional English Roast Beef Supper

From Time-Life’s Foods of the World – The Cooking of the British Isles (1969):



Roast Beef

To serve 6 to 8:

An 8-pound standing 3-rib roast

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees (it will take about 15 minutes for most ovens to reach this temperature). For the most predictable results, insert a meat thermometer into the thickest part of the beef, being careful not to let the top of the thermometer touch any fat or bone.

Place the beef, fat-side-up, in a large shallow roasting pan. (It is unnecessary to use a rack, since the ribs of the roast form a natural rack.)

Roast the beef undisturbed in the middle of the oven for 20 minutes. Reduce the heat to 325 degrees and continue to roast, without basting, for about 90 minutes, or until the beef is cooked to your taste. A meat thermometer will register 130 degrees to 140 degrees when the beef is rare, 150 degrees to 160 degrees when medium, and 160 degrees to 170 degrees when it is well done. If you are not using a thermometer, start timing the roast after you reduce the heat to 325 degrees. You can estimate approximately 12 minutes per pound for rare beef, 15 minutes per pound for medium, and 20 minutes per pound for well done.

Transfer the beef to a heated platter and let it rest for 15 minutes for easier carving. If you plan to accompany the beef with Yorkshire pudding, increase the oven heat to 400 degrees as soon as the beef is cooked. Transfer the roast from the oven to a heated platter, drape foil loosely over it and set it aside in a warm place while the pudding bakes. If you have two ovens, time the pudding to finish during the 15 minutes that the roast rests.

To carve, first remove a thin slice of beef from the large end of the roast so that it will stand firmly on its end. Insert a large fork below the top rib and carve slices of beef from the top, separating each slice from the bone as you proceed. Traditionally, roast beef is served with its own juices and with a horseradish sauce.

Note: Bringing meat to room temperature before cooking is unnecessary. Roasts may go directly from the refrigerator to the oven.


Horseradish Sauce

To make about 1 cup:

1/4 cup bottled horseradish, drained and squeezed dry in a kitchen towel
1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
1 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon dry English mustard
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon white pepper
1/2 cup heavy cream

In a small bowl, stir the horseradish, vinegar, sugar, mustard, salt and white pepper together until well-blended. Beat the cream with a whisk or a rotary or electric beater until stiff enough to form unwavering peaks on the beater when it is lifted from the bowl. Pour the horseradish mixture into the cream and, with a rubber spatula, fold together lightly but thoroughly. Serve the sauce from a sauceboat as an accompaniment to roast beef or to fish such as smoked trout, smoked eel and grilled salmon.


Yorkshire Pudding

To serve 6 to 8:

2 eggs
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 cup milk
2 tablespoons roast beef drippings, or substitute 2 tablespoons lard

To make the batter in a blender, combine the eggs, salt, flour and milk in the blender jar, and blend at high speed for 2 or 3 seconds. Turn off the machine, scrape down the sides of the jar, and blend again for 40 seconds. (To make the batter by hand, beat the eggs and salt with a whisk or a rotary or electric beater until frothy. Slowly add the flour, beating constantly. Then pour in the milk in a thin stream and beat until the mixture is smooth and creamy.) Refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. In 10-by-15-by-2.5-inch roasting pan, heat the fat over medium heat until it sputters. Briefly beat the batter again and pour it into the pan. Bake in the middle of the oven for 15 minutes, reduce the heat to 375 and bake for 15 minutes longer, or until the pudding has risen over the top of the pan and is crisp and brown. With a knife, divide the pudding into portions and serve immediately.

Yorkshire pudding is always served with roast beef. The same batter is used to make toad-in-the-hole.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 December 2013 at 19:25

It's worth noting that the book doesn't mention salt, pepper, onion, garlic or Worcestershire sauce for the beef. On one hand, perfection doesn't need any embellishment.... whistle

But on the other, if I were going to add any other flavours, I'd probably insert cloves of garlic into slits in the meat, then salt-and-pepper the roast and cover it with slices of fresh onion. I'd also probably brush occasionally with a mixture of Worcestershire sauce and the pan drippings. For beef, this is really all it needs to be wonderful, and I would resist adding more - even the Worcestershire sauce might be too much, so if I were going to use it, it would be sparingly.

Let the beef speak - it will make you proud. Thumb
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 December 2013 at 21:53
Hmmm - looks at lump in the fridge, watch this space tomorrow...
Roast beef in a large lump is 'comm'n-as-t'moock' around hereClown

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 December 2013 at 22:07
Looking forward to this! Clap
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 December 2013 at 12:29
If ya really wanna freak people out, deep fry it!!!!  Done in 20 mins or so.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 December 2013 at 15:45
Here is what I do.
Its based on what I learned growing up in a fairly traditional New Zealand home in the 1960's and '70s. At that time NZ was often considered more British than Britain, so roast beef was a fortnightly occurrence.
It was always served with Yorkshire Pudding and gravy.
Over the years I have adapted to new methods of cooking and a greater availability of different ingredients. Whole grain mustard being one. My first taste of whole grain mustard and roast beef way back in 1978 on my first trip to the UK, and I have loved it ever since.
So here is how I do a roast beef my way...

Weigh the meat to establish cooking time,
This varies from cooker to cooker so my advice is to read the instructions that came with it.
My roast is 2.6 kilograms and in my cooker that is 8 hours.

10:30am Wash and dry your meat

With a craft knife slash the skin on the slightly fatty side.
Heat your pan to smoking hot and sear the meat 2 minutes on each side
   
Sprinkle liberally with salt and pepper on the final turning. Splash 2-3 Tbsp Red wine vinegar over the meat to deglaze. Turn the pan off immediately
 
Transfer the meat to your slow cooker; and pour over the caramelised vinegar, salt, pepper and meat juices.
Now combine whole grain mustard and honey and smear over the meat.
   
Put the lid on and go enjoy your day...

3:00pm I have turned the meat over...

***I will continue this post in 4 hours time***
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 December 2013 at 22:25
Part Two

5:00pm I have decided that I don't want the meat to cook any more. This is a Bolar Roast which is a slow cook cut. It can happily sit wrapped in foil under a towel for a couple of hours while the rest happens.
It is time to prepare the Yorkshire Pudding Batter - 3/4c plain flour, an egg, 300ml milk and salt and pepper (Mum ALWAYS used white pepper).
  

I beat all that together on a high speed, scraping down twice to eliminate all lumps.
Now leave it to stand for an hour.

Strain the meat juices through a fine sieve, collect the mustard seeds and spread them back over the resting meat, whisk enough plain flour through the juices to thicken them. I estimate I had about 600mls of meat juices so I added a scant 1/4 cup of plain flour and whisked thoroughly before returning to the (cleaned) slow-cooker. Set the cooker on low and stir every 20 minutes.

 

Prepare the roast vegetables - Kumara and Potato tonight.
I like to use beef dripping which is not something you can buy easily anymore. So I asked the butcher for a couple of bags of suet from our last animal... I got suet and all the nice crisp white fat.
This is what a shopping bag of fat comes down to...

I cut a bit off and set it to heat in the oven,
When it is smoking I add the cut vegetables and toss them well to coat - they go into the oven @ 200°C for about 40 -50 minutes, turn them at least twice - every commercial break is a good rule of thumb apparently, but that doesn't work here because I don't watch television.

Now you have to wait while the veges cook....

Wondering how I keep the meat hot? 
I set it over the slow cooker with the gravy on lowest setting....

Everything is ready,
While the boys go shower I prep the Yorkshire pudding -
The bubbles are gone from the batter and it is creamy and smooth.
You can't see the smoke but this dish contains smoking hot beef dripping... add the batter fast
See how it starts to cook on impact? Get it back into the oven A.S.A.P! The oven is at 220°C.
Bake 10 to 15 minutes.
This is happening in real time - Back in soon Smile

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 December 2013 at 00:36
Part three:

I had hoped to show you great photos of a nice meal well presented....

and then the reality of roast beef dinner on a farm for working men hit, there was no way I could serve and photograph at the same time and deffinately no time for presentation - the men work hard and they are hungry
I did get these four shots in before the feeding frenzy...

It was niceCry  but there is none left.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 December 2013 at 01:32
I know that that roast is probably too well-done for most tastes, mine included, but farm workers like it well done. Also cooked this way it is not dry at all. It will slice perfectly for sandwiches tomorrow once it is cold and set up.
And a final comment - wholegrain mustard coating has all the elements of horse radish - just much nicer.

Its hot, its sharp, its tangy - and it grew above ground so it isn't a fusty old rootWink 


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 January 2015 at 16:50
Anne - 

I don't know how I missed this post, but everything looks great - and the photos are especially appreciated as I attempt this today and have never made Yorkshire pudding before! Clap

This meal is more of a "trial run" than anything else, as I've never made any of it. I took a few photos, but my primary objective is to simply gain some much-needed experience.

Roast - We actually have two of these: a quite-small (in length and mass) roast that must be from the end, and another that is about twice as long and twice as "big." I seasoned them simply, with kosher salt, freshly-cracked black pepper, granulated garlic and a light dusting of some good-quality, newly-acquired Worcestershire powder. Other than that, I've kept it pretty much "by the book" as described by my recipes from Time/Life above; the cooking times of course are determined by internal temperature, and I am monitering both roasts. Based on the preferences of The Beautiful Mrs. Tas, the target temperature (internal) is 150 to 155 degrees; a bit high for me, but you know the old saying about Mama being happy. I imagine we'll be having a lot of leftovers, by the way, because this is a ridiculous amount of beef - sandwiches or perhaps beef barley soup?

Horseradish Sauce - For whatever reason, we were absolutely unable to find just plain, ol' horseradish at three supermarkets in two towns, so we simply bought some "horseradish sauce" that we found. I'll sample a little bit with the meal, but am not planning on using much. Looking back, Anne's mustard option sounds great!

Yorkshire Pudding - This is something completely new to me, and I am really looking forward to it, possibly even more than the roast itself. My youngest son Roger is making it exactly as described above; one thing I will note is that the recipe above states: "To make the batter by hand, beat the eggs and salt with a whisk or a rotary or electric beater until frothy. Slowly add the flour, beating constantly. Then pour in the milk in a thin stream and beat until the mixture is smooth and creamy." After trying it this way, it seems to make more sense to add the milk first, and then the flour; otherwise, the "batter" really clumps up at first. Having said that, once the milk is added, the batter smooths out very nicely.

That's about where we're at now - I would like to get some gravy and roasted "OMG Potatoes" to go with this meal, but with one oven and the different cooking times/temperatures, this may not be possible....
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 January 2015 at 19:23
Yorkies are easy Ron. Think slightly thin pancake batter. Make it about 15 mins before the roast comes out of the oven. Once the roast is resting pour some of the fat into a muffin tin (about a Tbsp in each) then stir the batter again and pour enough in each muffin to fill about 2/3rds of the way. Into the oven for about 15-20 mins intil they look nice and golden & puffy. At that point the resting roast should be ready to carve.

As for the horseradish sauce... typically it a horeseradish/mayo mix. Personally I do prefer it a bit more than normal horseradish, so I wouldn't worry too much.

Mustard- yeah, whole grain or stone ground ,is great, but not a deal breaker.  Honestly there's so much flavour & stuff on the plate even yellow mustard brings something to the table.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 January 2015 at 20:52
Here's some inspiration for you.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 January 2015 at 21:22
In 2004 I just arrived in Fire Camp where my hunting buddy was contracted to feed 400 hungry forest fire fighters in Northern BC.
It was Prime Rib Night and I arrived at 3pm -dinner was at 7pm.
I asked what I could do and George said-"Make the Yorkies!!"
I said no problem and as he walked out he said "Three per man!!"
My recipe is
102 cups of flour
102 cups of eggs
102 cups of milk
S&P to taste
Yield 1216 Yorkshire puddings
I am a wine enthusiast. The more wine I drink, the more enthusiastic I become.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 January 2015 at 15:04
Well, guys - Ithat's a great photo, - mine wasn't quite that perfect, but seemed pretty close to me! And Murray, I am very glad that I didn't have to cook Yorkies for a crowd that big!

As for results, I am happy to say, that I believe I managed to cook a nearly-flawless prime rib roast for the first time; granted, it's not that difficult, but it's a project that I has always intimidated me, probably due to the amount of money that is potentially invovled. This was a pretty big roast that was from our family's herd, and it was incredible. 

I cooked it (and an accompanying smaller roast that needed to come out of the freezer) to a temperature of 150 degrees internal, and seem to have hit the sweet spot for our family's preference where "done-ness" is concerned. The meat was a bit more than medium, but not quite medium-well...except on the ends, which were well-done as The Beautiful Mrs. Tas prefers. 

The colour of the finished roast was really nice -  I was impressed that the roast was extremely juicy and easy to slice, with a deep, red center throughout the inside surrounded by a ring of crust on a beautiful, roasty-mahogany outside. The seasonings were simple - kosher salt, cracked black pepper, granulated garlic and just a hint of my new Worcestershirte powder - but they crusted onto the roast very, very nicely - easily as good as any that I've ever paid for, and better than most. 

The drippings were wonderful bombs of flavour, the meat was fork-tender through-and through (even the well-done sections) - and the flavour was everything that one could hope for with BEEF. I honestly am not sure that I could have done it any better, but I must give the bulk of the credit to the meat; it really was of superior quality. I took a few photos, but they really don't do the thing justice. I do not like to brag, but I am quite proud of the job I did with it.
 
My Yorkshire pudding was not quite as successful - it tasted great, but it didn't form the way I expected it to. Looking back, I see four potential reasons for this:
 
a) The "drippings" that I heated in the bottom of the pan might have been more "jus" than fat; also, I got the drippings sputtering hot, but not quite smoking.
 
b) The pan, even though it was the size proscribed by the recipe (12x15 inches), may have been too wide and shallow where surface area is concerned - a 9x13 pan might have done better.
 
c) This is the big one: my oven has a slight tilt toward the back-left, and with that wide, shallow pan, this caused a very marked pooling toward that corner of the pan. Even though I tried rotating the pan after a few minutes for even cooking, one corner of the pudding was much too thick, while the opposite corner was much too thin.
 
d) Either because of the pooling or simply due to my lack of experience, I believe the pudding was slightly under-cooked, but of course, in the shallow end, it was slightly over-cooked. In areas where there was a "happy medium," the pudding did rise and cook very nicely.

The rest of the meal was dead simple: just roasted potatoes and gravy from the pan juices. A vegetable should have been served as well, but it slipped my mind during the controlled chaos of the last half-hour or so of preparation.
 
All-in-all, though, it tasted really good and I am a huge fan of this meal - I will get the pudding right next time either in this form or perhaps as a toad-in-the-hole project.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 January 2016 at 18:06

These photos are from New Year’s Day, 2015, with a brief summary of the process. I thought I had already posted them, but found out otherwise when I went to make my prime rib roast for 2016!


Ah, well - better late than never….


For a detailed procedure and account, refer to my posts above; I learned quite a bit from this experience, but mostly what I learned was that this is easy and pretty much fool-proof with mouth-watering results, if you stick with the plan.


Here are the roasts that I used for the meal:



This turned out to be much more than we actually needed, but the smaller roast was already thawed when we found out we were having company, and the larger roast was obtained at a very, very good price. The leftovers went to very good use for sandwiches, beef barley soup and a couple of other nice things.


Here is a shot of the bone side of the roasts:



The tapering of the smaller roast, of course, indicates that it was taken from the very end of the loin, near the tail.


Behind the roasts in the two photos above, you can see that I kept things very simple as far as seasonings go. Aside from the salt and pepper, I used granulated garlic and Worcestershire powder, which I had purchased specifically for this project. I had wanted to cut shallow slits in the roast and insert garlic cloves, but we didn’t have any fresh garlic in the house, and the grocery store was closed in my one-horse town.


I really wanted the beef to be the star of the meal, so after patting the roasts dry and putting them in a roasting pan, I gave them a modest dusting of the seasonings:



I was especially eager to see how the Worcestershire powder would work, as in my experience it is near the top of the list for bringing out the beef in beef.


I followed the instructions in the recipe, roasting at high temperature for the first 20 minutes, then reducing the heat for a nice, slow ride to the finish. I was shooting for just a hair over medium in the center of the larger roast, and was hoping to see just barely well done on the ends for The Beautiful Mrs. Tas, who doesn’t like to hear a “moo” when she cuts into her beef. As it turned out, the results were exactly what i was trying for, and everyone was quite happy with what they had.


The seasonings and fat worked in perfect harmony to form a wonderful crust on the surface of the roasts; here’s a photo of the smaller roast:



And here’s the larger roast:



I liked the larger one so much that I took a shot from another angle, as well:



By this time, I had already completed the traditional horseradish sauce, and was just finishing the Yorkshire pudding.


WARNING! The Yorkshire pudding did not turn out quite the way it should have, for the reasons stated in my post above; therefore, this photos is an example of what not to do:



As you can see, the tilt resulted in thin, over-done pudding on one corner, and thick, under-done pudding at the other; however, the stuff in-between was - as the story goes - just right, and tasted great!


With that, I sliced an end off the larger roast and stood it up for carving:



My first couple of cuts were far too thick, but I got it figured out after that.


Results, as I mentioned above, were wonderful. The minimalist approach to seasoning the beef was indeed the right call, as the flavours that were used brought out the best of it. I was very much impressed with the Worcestershire powder, which, when used judiciously, will add an incredible dimension to any beef.


For New Year’s Day, 2016, I prepared our prime rib roast exactly the same way, and the family was treated to another wonderful experience. This is the way that I will be doing prime rib roasts forever, or at least until I discover a very compelling reason to do them differently.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 January 2016 at 22:36
Actually Tas - I think the "over" done side looks right. Its is supposed to be a crispy light hollow crust. Almost like an eclair.
Certainly not stodgy or solid.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 January 2016 at 20:12
Well, I guess I was better off than I thought! Big smile

It sure was good all-around ~ Star
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 January 2016 at 11:26
Looks great.

One of the things I like about a standing rib roast is that it's pretty hard to screw it up. Because of the fat content one can cook it too much and it's still tender. It's a battle I fight all the time. I like mine medium rare, but the rest of the family has an issue seeing the red.
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