Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Food, Health and Wellness > Food Safety
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Trichinosis and Sausage
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Trichinosis and Sausage

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Online
Points: 8141
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Trichinosis and Sausage
    Posted: 22 May 2014 at 20:38
On another discussion board, the issue of trichinosis risk in sausage came up. In case you aren't aware, trichinosis is a rather nasty parasite found in pork and some other meats from carnivorous and omnivorous animals. Unlike other food pathogens, trichinosis will not be killed by using a curing agent. Deep-freezing meat can kill some forms of trichinosis, but there are some things about that to be aware of.

The best way to eliminate the threat of trichinosis is to thoroughly cook meat that is at risk for trichinosis contamination. Most commonly, this meat includes pork (domestic and wild), bear, walrus and other animals that are carnivores or omnivores. 

MarkR and I hashed through some information and issues where there was some lack of clarity on this issue, and working together I think we've come up with some good, solid guidelines here regarding trichinosis safety:

a) Trichinosis is not killed by curing, but by cooking to a safe temperature; in some cases, deep-freezing for a safe length of time will eliminate the threat of trichinosis.

b) Deep freezing is ineffective for wild/game animals (other than pork) that are at risk for trichinosis; deep freezing can be effective for pork (domestic and wild), but there are variables to be aware of, according to the CDC:

http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/trichinellosis/prevent.html

c) Fresh sausage made with ground pork, wild boar or any other trichinosis-potential meat should be cooked to 160 degrees.

d) Whole cuts of pork are "safely-cooked" at 145 degrees, according to the USDA:

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/meat-preparation/fresh-pork-from-farm-to-table/CT_Index

e) The curing process effectively puts sausage on the same level as whole cuts where pathogens are concerned (excluding trichinosis, which needs to be cooked or frozen as mentioned above).

f) Cured meats are "safely cooked" at 145 degrees, according to the USDA:

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/meat-preparation/ham-and-food-safety/ct_index

g) Since meat with a potential for trichinosis still needs to be cooked before it is rendered safe to eat, cured sausages should be cooked to a minimum of 145 degrees.

h) A final temperature of 152 degrees is widely accepted by leading charcuterie experts for various reasons, one of those reasons being to ensure that all parts of the meat are at least 145 degrees.

i) All of the above assumes safe food-handling and storage practices.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
AK1 View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 10 April 2012
Location: Ontario, Canada
Status: Offline
Points: 1091
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2014 at 19:27
Between 2002 & 2007, 11 cases of Trichinosis were reported to the CDC in the US. All were from wild game or home raised pigs.  I don't honestly believe this is a big issue. If in 5 yrs 2.2 people per year out of 350 million got sick... I ain't gonna worry about it.


Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Online
Points: 8141
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 May 2014 at 11:44
Aye, Darko - the chances for trichinosis are very small, thank goodness; as you say, wild boars or some home-raising of pork, along with cross-contamination, are really the only big risks left with this parasite. However, being the nasty ceature that it is - and since normal curing doesn't kill it - I figured some awareness would be a good thing.

Beef and venison, I am much more cavalier about - since curing them will eliminate pathogens. But with pork, the little bit of extra effort could be worth it.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Karl View Drop Down
Cook
Cook
Avatar

Joined: 23 January 2012
Location: Juneau
Status: Offline
Points: 203
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Karl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 September 2014 at 16:05
Someone gave us two 5# black bear summer sausages for a camping SAREX  a few years back.  It was fall fish/garbage bear and spiced within an inch of its life.  Black bears have such a problem with trichinosis that I played it safe and thoroughly fried all of the sausage before making pasta.  We had a dozen teenage cadets so it was all eaten.  It was a very STRONG meat but no one had many complaints. 

This is what ADF&G has to say:  http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=disease.muscle2 
Back to Top
Karl View Drop Down
Cook
Cook
Avatar

Joined: 23 January 2012
Location: Juneau
Status: Offline
Points: 203
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Karl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 September 2014 at 16:13
http://www.epi.hss.state.ak.us/bulletins/docs/b2000_18.htm
http://www.adn.com/article/20121025/dinner-black-bear-leads-rare-trichinosis-infection-nikiski-man
http://www.epi.alaska.gov/bulletins/docs/b1985_10.htm

It seems pretty safe to assume that bear is infected here so it needs to be very thoroughly cooked.  This article (not for the weak of stomach) discusses Kodiak bear diseases including worms:  http://www.munseysbearcamp.com/bears.html
Back to Top
AK1 View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 10 April 2012
Location: Ontario, Canada
Status: Offline
Points: 1091
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 September 2014 at 13:12
My understanding is that if one takes wild meat, bear, boar... and freezes it for at least 30 days, it will kill trichinosis bacteria.
Back to Top
Karl View Drop Down
Cook
Cook
Avatar

Joined: 23 January 2012
Location: Juneau
Status: Offline
Points: 203
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Karl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 September 2014 at 18:23
Originally posted by AK1 AK1 wrote:

My understanding is that if one takes wild meat, bear, boar... and freezes it for at least 30 days, it will kill trichinosis bacteria.


I have also heard that deep freezing can kill some versions of trichinosis but this is what ADF&G has to say:

Can I eat the meat? [can infect dogs]  [cook well]
  • People can get trichinosis by eating infected meat that has not been adequately cooked.
  • Meat should be well cooked (internal temperature of meat should be at least 160° F).
  • Freezing meat does NOT kill the Trichnella species found in Alaska's wildlife.
  • Smoking, drying, salting or microwaving do not always kill the parasites, only proper cooking or canning is known to make the meat safe to eat.
  • Do not feed infected parts to dogs.

I do not know how common these deep freeze resistant species are in the l. 48(?) 

On the good side, one of our local "garbage fish,"  flounder has an anti-freeze enzyme which caused the meat to turn into "fish flavored mashed potatoes" but recent studies show that freezing these flounder below 0F will keep the meat solid when cooked. 
Back to Top
Boilermaker View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 23 July 2010
Location: Marietta, GA
Status: Offline
Points: 673
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 October 2014 at 18:32
Originally posted by Karl Karl wrote:

http://www.epi.hss.state.ak.us/bulletins/docs/b2000_18.htm
http://www.adn.com/article/20121025/dinner-black-bear-leads-rare-trichinosis-infection-nikiski-man
http://www.epi.alaska.gov/bulletins/docs/b1985_10.htm

It seems pretty safe to assume that bear is infected here so it needs to be very thoroughly cooked.  This article (not for the weak of stomach) discusses Kodiak bear diseases including worms:  http://www.munseysbearcamp.com/bears.html


I killed a black bear in Newfoundland several years ago and asked about trichinosis.  They said it wasn't endemic to Newfoundland but I cooked the meat thoroughly anyway and made bear stew and chili out of it.  Wasn't taking any chances because trichinosis is bad stuff. 
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.063 seconds.