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Turos Teszta

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DIYASUB View Drop Down
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Joined: 01 May 2010
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    Posted: 01 May 2010 at 09:12
 Being that this is my first post I think I'll go with one of the simplest recipes I know that also happens to be just about impossible to ruin.
 
 Cottage Cheese and Noodles
 
 1 LB. bacon
 14oz.s egg noodles
 2LB.s small curd cottage cheese
 
 Okay, here we go.
 Dont bother with expensive bacon, it isnt necessary. As a matter of fact this recipe seems to do better with the cheapest bacon you can find!
 Fry up the whole pound till it's crisp. Cool it and run it through your food processor till you've turned it into bacon bits. No cheating! Store bought bacon bits just dont work well, and store bought Imitation bacon bits arent even fit for human consumption!
 Now, we dont want this to take all day so we'll do a little juggling. Cook the noodles at the same time the bacon is cooking. When they're done drain them and put them back into the same pot.
 Time to pick up the pace and finish up. To do that, throw in the bacon bits, throw in the cottage cheese, and put a low flame under the pot. Stirring it every few minutes will keep it from burning and assure a good mix of all ingredients. Once the cheese has pretty much melted it's done.
 Enjoy!
 
 Variations
 Want to add more cottage cheese? Fine, go ahead! Like it to have a little more body? Add four or five slices of American cheese! A little bit of stretch? Go ahead, toss in a couple of slices of mozzarella.
 Do not add anything you might find in your spice cabinet!
 
 This is a stick to your ribs sort of meal. You wont find it on the menu of a five star establishment in Budapest. All you'll get there is a lamb chop the size of a quarter with some chocolate raspberry sauce drizzled over it and a sprig of parsley next to it. For eighty dollars.
 After you leave that fine establishment still hungry and wanting something that'll actually stick to your ribs find your way to the sort of place to locals go to and ask for Turos Teszta.
 
 Might as well give you the phonetic pronunciation= Too-dosh Taste-uh.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 May 2010 at 09:14
oh, man ~ that does look good! thanks for posting!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 May 2010 at 13:37
Man, does this sound like a meal! Great post, and thanks for sharing Dya. I was just talking to my mom today about her old-world Polish method of making cottage cheese....dry and crumbly as opposed to the liquidy style we eat here. She missed it and mentioned a couple recipes one much like this one! It is definitely on my list...love cottage cheese of any type.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DIYASUB Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 May 2010 at 14:24

 Store bought cottage cheese can vary greatly in consistency from brand to brand. The only way to find out which best suits your needs is to buy three different kinds at once and open them all up for comparison testing.

 Another way to get around the problem of soggy cottage cheese is simply to put it in a soup strainer and shake it like Jiffy Pop. You'll get a drier cottage cheese and a bit of whey that can be used in other recipes if you have need of it. If not, give it to that creature who thinks eating things right off the yellow line in the middle of the highway is fine dining, the family dog.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 May 2010 at 17:20
That's my kind of comfort food...gotta give this a try one of these days.
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rod Franklin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 May 2010 at 11:06
Cottage cheese and noodles.Thumbs Up Try adding some sweated cabbage and onions. Grandma would even occasionally add just a touch of sugar. 
Hungry
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kiwi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 May 2010 at 15:31
Originally posted by Rivet Rivet wrote:

Man, does this sound like a meal! Great post, and thanks for sharing Dya. I was just talking to my mom today about her old-world Polish method of making cottage cheese....dry and crumbly as opposed to the liquidy style we eat here. She missed it and mentioned a couple recipes one much like this one! It is definitely on my list...love cottage cheese of any type.

can we look forward to the recipe in a post?
 
kiwi -
 
as soon as i can afford the ingredients, i'm on this - i found a method, and it looks not only easier than i thought, but completely natural. in fact, it's pretty similar to your paneer.
 
more on this as soon as i can.
 
ron
kai time!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 May 2010 at 03:53
I'll give her a call this weekend Kiwi, and see if I can get it from her. We spoke about that cottage cheese a month or two ago, and I didn't think to ask her for the recipe!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 June 2010 at 15:26

john - any update on this one? the home made cottage cheese sounds like a great project ~

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 June 2010 at 17:04
I spoke to her about it, and she said she never made nor heard about dry cottage cheese. Her family way was always the kind we are familiar with, having moisture- whey. Too bad, ey? This recipe does sound real good, and wonder if we can get the details.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rockydog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 June 2010 at 21:23
The cottage cheese we are used to today has very little whey in it. Once the curd has set due the addtion of rennet and starter it is cut and the curd and whey seperate. The whey is drained off leaving a fairly dry curd. (Cottage cheese whey is very acidy and does not have much value once it's been drained from the curd unlike whey from other styles of cheese.) The dry curd is then mixed with a dressing made from milk, skim milk, condensed skim, cream, buttermilk etc. Some have some added gums or thickeners too. The major differences in cottage cheese come from the dressing recipes. Many of these are closely guarded secrets. Once you find one you like it's pretty hard to change to another. RD
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