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Waffles

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gracoman View Drop Down
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    Posted: 14 February 2015 at 11:41


Cornmeal waffles with homemade strawberry syrup


Waffles
While the Middle Dutch wafele is first attested to at the end of the 13th century, it is preceded by the French walfre in 1185; both are considered to share the same Frankish etymological root wafla. Depending on the context of the use of wafla, it either means honeycomb or cake.  - Wikipedia

The following is from Waffle History.

Waffles have an extraordinarily long history with beginnings in Ancient Greece (1100 B.C.E. to 146 B.C.E.) where flat cakes, called obleios or wafers, were cooked between two hot metal plates. They are primarily savory in nature, flavored with cheeses and herbs

During the Middle Ages (400 C.E. to 1000 C.E.) obloyeurs. make different types of oublies, as the word has evolved from the Greek. They are served flat or rolled into filled coronets (cones).

13th Century. The oublie becomes the waffle in the 1200s, when a craftsman has the idea of forging  some cooking plates or “irons” that reproduce the characteristic pattern of honeycombs. The word gaufre, from the Old French for waffle (wafla), first appears in print at this time. Wafla means “a piece of honeybee hive.” Other early waffle irons designs include landscapes, coats of arms and religious symbols. The batter is placed between hinged plates that are then pressed together with wooden handles, held over the hearth fire to bake and flipped manually.

16th Century. Waffles serve all echelons of society. They are made of water and bad flour and eaten by the poor during bread shortages. While waffles for the common people are thick, waffles for the privileged class add eggs, milk and honey to create delicate and tasty waffles.

1620. Dutch “wafles” come to America with the Pilgrims, who spend time in Holland prior to sailing to America.

1735. The word “waffle,” with two “fs,” appears in print in English for the first time.

1789. At the start of the French Revolution, Thomas Jefferson returns to the U.S. from his position as Minister to France. Along with a pasta machine, he brings a long-handled waffle iron that encloses the batter and gives the waffle crispness and shape. This begins the trend of “waffle frolics” or waffle parties, where guests can enjoy their waffles sweet (with maple syrup or molasses) or savory (topped with kidney stew). Slaves get the leftovers as a special treat. This evolves into the southern favorite, chicken and waffles.

1800s. Vendors on city streets sell hot waffles slathered with molasses or maple syrup.

1869. Cornelius Swarthout of Troy, New York, a Dutch-American, receives a patent for the first waffle iron in the U.S., on August 24th. Described as a “device to bake waffles,” one heats up the waffle iron over a coal stove, pour batter on the griddle, close the cover and after a few minutes, flip the griddle and cook the other side of the waffle. It becomes very popular. The anniversary of the patent is now celebrated as National Waffle Day.

1911. General Electric introduces the first electric waffle iron designed by Thomas J. Stackbeck, which has a built-in thermostat to keep the waffles from burning due to overheating. Today’s waffle irons have essentially the same mechanics, with technology upgrades that offer non-stick surfaces, lighter-weight materials, fancy designs (flowers, Mickey Mouse, Hello Kitty) and plates that are removable for washing or to change designs.

1930s. Waffle irons become standard kitchen appliances.

1953. Brothers Tony, Sam and Frank Dorsa introduce Eggo frozen toaster waffles to supermarkets throughout the United States. Originally called “Froffles,” people started referring to them as “Eggos” because of their “eggy” taste. Going with the flow, the brothers change the name of the product in 1955. The brand is purchased by Kellogg in the 1970s.

1964. “Belgian waffles” debut at the New York World’s Fair in Flushing, Queens. Maurice Vermersch sells his wife’s recipe for Brussels waffles—fluffy yeast waffles with with strawberries and whipped cream. Realizing when the Fair opens that most Americans don’t know where Brussels is, he changes the name to Belgian waffles.

21st Century. The “nouvelle waffle”: cross-referencing and fusion cuisine. Sure, maple syrup still tastes great, but there’s a whole wide world of influence now. See the next section for ideas. And revive the “waffle frolic.” (We don’t know that Thomas Jefferson started the the “frolics,” but if he hadn’t brought the waffle iron back from Paris and served them to his influential friends, waffles wouldn’t have become fashionable at that time.






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gonefishin View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 February 2015 at 13:21
   really nice write up, graco!  On a subject I love, yet was surprised to learn so much about...thanks!  My favorite waffles start with a nice yeasty batter...love the smell, love the taste Tongue
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 February 2015 at 14:16
Fascinating write up. Very interesting. Thank you. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 February 2015 at 17:25
Damn! Now I want some waffles, & I just finished dinner.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 February 2015 at 17:31
I'd hit that, gMan! Great job, and great writing!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 February 2015 at 17:44
I was preparing cornmeal waffles with strawberry syrup and decided to google waffle history while waiting for my Belgian waffle cooker to come to temp.  I didn't expect to find anything much more than a few pics of old stove top waffle irons.  What a surprise! 

There were waffle battles over who had the rights to peddle waffles in the best locations.  Waffle sales had to be regulated to keep the peace.  No waffle maker could be within 6 feet of another.  This is crazy stuff!

Who'd a thunk LOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 February 2018 at 10:07
No one knows for sure where the dish chicken and waffles originated.  The South like to claim this as one of their own but it is more likely an invention of the Wells Supper Club in Harlem.  Wherever the dish comes from it is here to stay.

These days it seems anything and everything is paired with waffles so I thought I'd give one of these over-the-top creations a run.  I already had a brisket on the smoker so why not

Smoked Brisket & Waffles

First we need a smoked brisket.  I can pick up a prime brisket at my local Costco for less than a choice cut sells for in any local grocery store meat department so Costco it is.


Next, I made a spiced honey by bringing from clove studded lemon slices and cinnamon sticks to a boil.


Now, glazed apricots by cooking dried apricots with fresh squeezed orange juice and cinnamon sticks until the juice becomes a syrup


The final accompaniment is a cherry jalapeno bbq sauce made with frozen tart cherries, cherry preserves, diced jalapeno peppers, garlic, chili powder, onion, Worcestershire sauce, molasses, liquid smoke, chicken stock, and fresh lemon juice.  Cook this down then puree and pass through a fine sieve for a smooth sauce.


Smoked brisket over cheddar jalapeno cornbread waffles and topped with spiced honey, glazed apricots, and cherry jalapeno bbq sauce.  A memorable to-much-food brunch


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 February 2018 at 09:42
That brisket looks incredible, gMan - all very nice photos, and your creation looks (and sounds) very good!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 February 2018 at 14:30
Originally posted by gracoman gracoman wrote:


Smoked Brisket & Waffles


I've never been a fan of the chicken & waffle craze. I'm not sure why, just something about the savory chicken clashes with the sweet waffle. But then I eat bacon and waffles which one could argue is the same sweet / savory mix so who knows.

Anyway, if there was a place around here serving brisket and waffles that looked like that, I would be all over it! I might just have to suggest it to the local BBQ joint.

Thanks for the post! Clap
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 February 2018 at 15:19
I love waffles. But I never bought into the chicken and waffles thing. To me, that's two different dishes sharing a plate. Feel the same way about most surf & turfs. A hunk of beef and a lobster tail on the same plate is two different dishes.

Silly of me, I know. But what can you do?

This doesn't detract, G-man, from the fact that you've put together a great looking meal. And for those who go for the idea of a major protein sitting on a waffle, I'm sure it's appealing to the tastebuds, too. Just not to mine. Alas!
But we hae meat and we can eat
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 February 2018 at 08:25
I've never eaten chicken and waffles myself.  It seems like an okay combination, I guess. But drenched in maple syrup?  That part I don't get.  There must be something to it considering the popularity of the dish.  I know my daughter is all over it but she's got bad genes.

What I did here was an attempt to reproduce a dish that was at one time on the weekend brunch menu of a local brew pub.  It appealed to me for several reasons.

These particular waffles, the waffles I made, are really just waffley jalapeno cornbread cooked in a Belgian waffle maker with the addition of corn kernals.  Waffley because this cornbread has stiff peak egg whites folded into the batter. Cornbread and brisket?  Check.

The cherry jalapeno bbq sauce was something I just had to try on account of it being cherry bbq sauce.  What the heck is that?  When I googled it I found endless variations so apparently it is a thing.  Now its a thing I may play with more often.  BBQ sauce and brisket?  Check.

I thought the apricots would be a nice touch of sweetness to cut the richness and intensity of smoked beef brisket.  Fruit and brunch?  Check.

The spiced honey was included just because it was part of the original dish.  I didn't think I'd actually use more than a bit of that but it was surprisingly good.  Well, of course it was.  Honey and cornbread have always been a thing.  At least to us backward Northerners it has.  We likes our cornbread cakey and sweetened.  Not at all like the Southern stuff which is basically fried and baked in in a hot cast iron skillet with plenty of fat.  Honey and cornbread?  Check.

This was a fun dish to make and it looks impressive as heck.  The biggest drawback here was it is way to much food to put on one plate.  Who's gonna eat all of that?  Wait a minute.  I almost forgot where I live. American bbq brunch and to much food?  Check.

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