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xocolatl

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kiwi View Drop Down
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    Posted: 26 May 2010 at 15:39
Anyone else make this take on hot chocolate?

Jose de Acosta, a Spanish Jesuit missionary who lived in Peru and then Mexico in the later 16th century, described xocolatl as:

Loathsome to such as are not acquainted with it, having a scum or froth that is very unpleasant taste. Yet it is a drink very much esteemed among the Indians, where with they feast noble men who pass through their country. The Spaniards, both men and women, that are accustomed to the country, are very greedy of this Chocolate. They say they make diverse sorts of it, some hot, some cold, and some temperate, and put therein much of that "chili"; yea, they make paste thereof, the which they say is good for the stomach and against the catarrh.[13]


Anyway, in a nutshell it's spiced cocoa drink. I'm not hardcore so I put sugar in mine :) I've been putting chili in store bought hot choc powder for a while, thought I really should have a lash at making some myself. I do it in a mortar and pestle. I'm sipping on some now (and thought I should post the recipe) but next time I make it I'll take some photos.

I do it all in my big mortar.

First give a good couple of grinds of black pepper from your mill into the pestle, and get that ground nice and fine. it's harder to grind the spices once everything is in there so we do it first. then I add a teaspoon of extremely hot chilli powder. I get this stuff from a specialty Indian shop, and when I buy it the shopkeeper laughs at my skin tone and says "haha, this is the real shit my man", just give you a spiciness idea. keep grinding the chili and pepper, and I add a good teaspoon of a spice mix I make in bulk for baking, containing nutmeg, allspice and a touch of clove. I then add a more level teaspoon of cinnamon. give it a really good grind, it will help flavour extraction in the brew, and help reduce sediment on the bottom of the mug (meaning more yum in your mouth).

After that's all in there, I add a bit of granulated sugar of some description to help grind the spices more. I use coffee crystals if they're around, but white sugar will work as well. we just need a teaspoon or so for its abrasiveness.

when that's all ground as well, add 3 teaspoons of brown sugar. my favourite is muscovado sugar, but if that isn't available, normal brown sugar will work as well. grind grind grind, mix mix mix.

I then add 4 tablespoons of GOOD cocoa (because not all cocoa is created equal), grind grind grind, mix mix mix, done!

I put about a tablespoon in a mug, and add a little boiling water, stir lots, then slowly add more water while stirring. I add a bit of milk as well, no more than you'd put in tea though.

Well that is my not very traditional take on this stuff. It's bloody popular round here. I'm pretty much making a batch a day. You'll have to experiment with the recipe a little yourself, as of course spices vary a lot depending on where you get them. I like mine pretty 'dark', but i have very powerful cocoa, so I don'thave to use as much.

Enjoy!
kai time!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 May 2010 at 02:30
Sounds awesome....now that's what this board is about. Something truly different from one country to another. I wish I knew where to get good cocoa...I like to put it in my chili con carne as well.
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kiwi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 May 2010 at 04:45
haven't heard that one hoser, will try it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 May 2010 at 04:58
Outstanding post, Kiwi! Great effort on your part making it from scratch but undoubtedly a truly high quality flavor. Your addition of sugar to help with the grinding abrasives is a neat idea. I've tried some very mild versions of this, certainly not with all that real chili in it. Going to have to give this one a try! Oh, and yes, pleasepost pics of the next time you make it...I imagine it looks very nice and frothy.
 
Originally posted by Hoser Hoser wrote:

Sounds awesome....now that's what this board is about. Something truly different from one country to another. I wish I knew where to get good cocoa...I like to put it in my chili con carne as well.
 
Dave, you can use any high quality unsweetened cocoa powder for this. Nestle or Hershey's are good places to start and you should find them in the baking aisle of the grocery store. If you have access to a gourmet or import store, you can get top notch imported cocoa powder for just this application. If you want, I can check out mama jean's here and see if I can get hold of some central american cocoa powder.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kiwi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 May 2010 at 15:08
It isn't really frothy at all actually. I guess I could use the steam wand on the espresso machine, but I think I prefer hot chocolate smooth. I just had the last of the previous batch I made, so I'll get some photos shortly.
kai time!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2010 at 02:33
Originally posted by Rivet Rivet wrote:

 
Dave, you can use any high quality unsweetened cocoa powder for this. Nestle or Hershey's are good places to start and you should find them in the baking aisle of the grocery store. If you have access to a gourmet or import store, you can get top notch imported cocoa powder for just this application. If you want, I can check out mama jean's here and see if I can get hold of some central american cocoa powder.
No problem John...I wasn't aware that Nestle's was a good cocoa...I have that in the cupboard, and will continue to use it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kiwi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2010 at 16:35
if you have an artisan chocolate shop nearyou, ask them for their source of cocoa, or try to buy some off you. I get some organic stuff in an expensive supermarket.
kai time!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kiwi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 May 2010 at 02:42
Pictorial as promised. I even employed flatmate and expert mortar operator Nisarg to grind so I could take photos LOL look at him go:


Now that is a man who is focused on his grinding. Big smile

Anyway, as per recipe, starting with the pepper to get that ground as fine as poss (it's the most problematical ingredient, so it gets the most attention)


Grind up, then the rest of the spices join it:


Grind grind grind


after adding the sugar and grinding, you should be looking a bit like this:


Then we add the brown sugar and cocoa, make sure it's well mixed. it's in a mortar already so it's pretty easy to get a nice blend. Then, we hide it in plain sight:

No one can figure out where I'm keeping the stuff. Long may it last.

All done!

The mug shown has had a bit of milk added.
Cheers
Kiwi

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 May 2010 at 02:49
Good "action" shots there Kiwi...thanksClap
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 May 2010 at 07:48
excellent pictorial, kiwi, and a great-looking finish!
 
is that a tim-tam sitting next to the cup?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 May 2010 at 14:52
Beautiful! Great grindings and finished mug  Clap
 
Definitely another "signature" post!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kiwi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 May 2010 at 18:17
Hell yeah that's a tim tam Clap well identified. Get them in the US?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 May 2010 at 19:24
we could probably order them off the internet or something, but i have never personally seen them for alse around here. i must however remind you that i live in montana, which is similar to living in siberia! Wink
 
a co-worker's son and daughter-in-law live in australia and she goes to visit once a year or so she always brings back several packages of tim tams and also scores me some turkish delights and crunchies!Embarrassed
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kiwi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 May 2010 at 20:10
That's unfortunate. Tim tams are a basic human right.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 May 2010 at 21:32
they are very good, indeed. the chocolate down there is quite different, in a good way. less sweet yet more flavourful. good stuff!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kiwi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 May 2010 at 21:57
Sipping on a cup of this now. I think the next batch will use vanilla infused white sugar to try and get somevanilla flavour into it. Shame vanilla beans are pretty muchthe most expensive spice around (along with saffron)
kai time!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kiwi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 March 2011 at 02:47
It's cold enough now that I'm having hot showers again now, so I think I'm going to break out this recipe again... It is most yummy.

I'm going to try using my blender to get a smooth powder.... might work might not...
kai time!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 March 2011 at 14:54
Originally posted by kiwi kiwi wrote:

It's cold enough now that I'm having hot showers again now, so I think I'm going to break out this recipe again...
 
 
Nothing better in cool or cold weather than some honest, made from scratch hot chocolate, and if you're doing it the "real, old-fashioned way" so much the better!
 
In order to help you get it authentically frothy, what you might want to get is a "molinillo" a Spanish/Mexican invention that is twirled between the palms of the hands and froths up the xocolatl perfectly.
 
 
Apparently the Spaniards invented it in the 1700's, they say. You can read about the device HERE.
 
In my area, the cheapest I could find one is $4.99 (US) HERE, where you can buy it through the mail or internet.
 
If you know of anyone living in the SouthWest US, you could probably get one for a dollar, maybe two at Wal-Mart in that region. Same thing with anyone in Mexico.
 
This thing will froth up a mug of xocolatl in about 30 seconds!
 
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