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Zbojnícka kapsa

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Furtwangler View Drop Down
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    Posted: 11 July 2014 at 11:49

The title means ''bandit's saddlebag'' and it is very popular in restaurants in Slovakia nowadays. Normally I don't hold modern Slovak restaurant inventions in high esteem, but this is actually a good idea. It's meat ragout in a large potato pancake, often topped with grated cheese.

To make zemiakové placky (the pancakes), you'll need about a pound of grated raw potatoes, finely chopped onions (not too much, perhaps one large), finely chopped garlic (a little, e.g. two cloves), dried marjoram (a teaspoon maybe), salt, pepper, an egg, several tablespoons of flour to hold it together. Mix it all into a batter and then fry rather thin pancakes in lard. For this recipe they should be quite large, but otherwise they're made much smaller.

The ragout can be pretty much anything you like. A good idea would be the classic Hungarian pork pörkölt. Cubed pork is seared in lard, removed from it, quite a lot of chopped onion is added, fried, then some chopped garlic and paprika, the meat is returned to the pan, seasoned, barely covered with water and braised covered. To improve upon this basic recipe, you could add some wild mushrooms, some chicken livers, perhaps a bit of strong mustard or worcester sauce (the latter is quite popular nowadays in Slovakia).

The pancake is then stuffed with the ragout and often sprinkled with grated cheese. Various pickles may be served with it. It's the Slovak response to tacos, it seems.

"La cuisine, c'est quand les choses ont le go√Ľt de ce qu'elles sont."
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Melissa Mead View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 July 2014 at 18:08
Sounds delicious!
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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 July 2014 at 09:06
This sounds like something I could love very much - thank you for sharing, Tomas! 

I will try this at the next opportunity. Any recommendations on the cheese? Tvaroh, perhaps?
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Furtwangler View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Furtwangler Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 July 2014 at 01:21
Well, in restaurants they use a local imitation of Edam, but I think good English country cheddar or Manchego will do more justice to the dish. Any good, aged semihard-to-hard cheese in fact, one that is also quite salty. As for traditional Slovak cheeses, only good smoked sheep's milk oŇ°tiepok makes sense to me here. But I assume it's going to be difficult to get outside Slovakia.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 July 2014 at 00:38
I think I could eat two or ten of those. It sounds delicious. Thankyou for posting Tomas!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 July 2014 at 22:06
Originally posted by Furtwangler Furtwangler wrote:

Well, in restaurants they use a local imitation of Edam, but I think good English country cheddar or Manchego will do more justice to the dish. Any good, aged semihard-to-hard cheese in fact, one that is also quite salty. As for traditional Slovak cheeses, only good smoked sheep's milk oŇ°tiepok makes sense to me here. But I assume it's going to be difficult to get outside Slovakia.

This makes perfect sense, Tomas - thank you for the information ~ ! I will be trying this.... Star
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