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Zuurkool stamppot (sauerkraut stew)

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pitrow View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Zuurkool stamppot (sauerkraut stew)
    Posted: 24 August 2018 at 10:14
First off, let me say "stew" is not quite the right term for this, but I can't quite put my finger on what it would be in English. Stamppot is a widely used term in Dutch cuisine that refers to a variety of dishes that contain mashed ingredients, usually potatoes though not always. My other thread here Borenkool met worst is another example of stamppot, as is hutspot, which is a lot closer to what Americans know as stew (and coincidentally the origin of the term "hodge podge").  ChrisFlanders also talks about "stoemp" in his Stoemp, potatoes with a high waaw factor post and it is a similar concept, I'm guessing they are pretty much the same just the name being different in Belgium.

Secondly, let me also say that I've never actually had this dish, as mom was not a fan of it, so this is mostly gleaned from internet sources. Like most "home style" cooking everyone has their own recipe and there's no right way or wrong way to do this, below is just one example. I chose a recipe with Salmon as it sounds rather good to me, but more traditionally this would be sausage (seems like just about every stamppot recipe calls for sausage).  If you want a more traditional recipe, this one looks good to me.

Zuurkoolstamppot met zalm (Sauerkraut stamppot with salmon)


  • 400 gram sauerkraut (about 14 ounces)
  • 400 gram salmon fillet (a pound would work well)
  • 200 ml crème fresh / sour cream (13.5 tablespoons, or a little more than 3/4ths cup)
  • 40 gram butter (a little less than 3 tablespoons) [divided]
  • 2 glasses of white wine [divided]
  • 1 small onion/shallot [divided]
  • 1 clove of garlic [divided]
  • 1 bay leaf
  • salt and pepper

Prepare the sauerkraut
Start by letting the sauerkraut drain in a colander or fine mesh sieve.
Chop the onion and garlic and fry half of each in a pan with some of the butter until translucent.
Add the sauerkraut and stir well.
Add one glass of wine along with the bay leaf and a dash of pepper.
Heat over low heat for about twenty minutes until the sauerkraut is al dente.

Prepare the salmon and sauce
Season the salmon filet lightly with salt and pepper
Heat the rest of the butter in a pan and fry the salmon until done, about 5 minutes on each side. Do not over cook or it will be dry. Set the salmon aside.
Saute the remaining garlic and onion in the pan, then add the second glass of wine and reduce until about a tablespoon remains.
Strain the solids out of the reduction and add the creme fresh and bring to a slight boil.
When the sauce starts to bind it is ready, season to taste with salt and pepper.

Presentation
Place a helping of sauerkraut on a plate, top with a portion of salmon and spoon the sauce over top.

(note, not my picture)

Mike
Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog
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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 August 2018 at 10:54
Mike - this looks great and I'm glad that you posted it. I can easily see this being served on one of those winter evenings, when everything is grey outside and good food warms the soul.

The photo with the salmon looks great - I got to thinking that making this with smoked salmon might knock it out of the park! Either way - very nice!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 August 2018 at 12:52

Originally posted by Mike Mike wrote:

If you want a more traditional recipe, this one looks good to me.


I got to thinking that embedded links often "die' as servers change etc., so I decided to go ahead and "grab" the recipe that Mike refers to above, with credit going back to that source.

Here it is, along with some notes and a photo - and it does look good!

Quote Zuurkoolstamppot
Sauerkraut-Potato Puree with Crispy Bacon

Karin Engelbrecht
July 25, 2018

Prep: 10 mins
Cook: 20 mins
Yield: 4 servings



Sauerkraut has long been a vital source of vitamin C during cold Dutch winters, but the Dutch did not discover this wholesome food. In fact, it is said that the builders of the Great Wall of China kept their strength up with pickled cabbage, and it is likely that Tartares brought the recipe for sauerkraut with them to Russia and Western Europe, where sweet-sour flavors were much loved in the Middle Ages. Thanks to the increasing awareness of the health benefits of lacto-fermentation, old-fashioned fermented foods are once again gaining in popularity in the Netherlands, and beyond. Of course, today zuurkoolstamppot is mostly enjoyed for its hearty comfort in the colder months, but knowing it's good for you is heartening too. Traditionally sauerkraut stamppot is also served with rookworst, but we usually leave out this smoked Dutch sausage, because the bacon in the recipe already imparts plenty of porky flavor.


3.3 lb (1.5 kg) floury potatoes
3/4 lb (350 g) lean unsmoked cured bacon/zuurkoolspek
1.75 lb (750 g) sauerkraut
2 cups (475 ml) milk
2 tbsp butter
Salt & pepper, to taste
1 cup (40 g) celery leaf (selderieblad), to taste

Peel and dice the potatoes and cook in salted water in a large soup pot for 20 minutes, or until tender.

In a skillet or frying pan, fry the bacon until just crispy, and drain on kitchen paper. Add the sauerkraut to the bacon fat in the pan and allow to warm through. Meanwhile, warm the milk in a small saucepan.

Drain, shake and dry the potatoes with kitchen towels before mashing with a potato masher or ricer. Quickly add the warmed milk and butter to the potatoes and season to taste.
04Fold the sauerkraut through the mashed potatoes. Crumble the bacon and finely chopped celery leaves over the dish, fold through, and serve piping hot.

Tips:

Celery leaf is a commonly used herb in the Netherlands and it is available in most Dutch supermarkets. If it is hard to find where you live, simply buy a bunch of stick celery and use the tender interior leaves.

Zuurkoolspek is a Dutch bacon variety made from pork belly cured in a salt brine. If you can't find it where you live, ask your butcher to recommend something similar.

While stamppotten are usually served as a main meal in the Netherlands, you could also serve this as a side dish with pork, beef or game meats.

https://www.thespruceeats.com/zuurkoolstamppot-recipe-sauerkraut-1128831
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 August 2018 at 14:02
Pitrow, 

This looks wonderful !  And I do agree it would be a wonderful autumn / winter warm up ..  Though our autumns ( Indian  Summers ) are still quite warm up until mid November and sometimes later November ..   Then we get hit with more seasonal climate ..

I think some fresh wild trout (coral type flesh )  would be absolutely a Marvel with the kraut too  !!   

Wild fresh salmon is  quite costly due to the reduced amounts  coming from Alaska to Spain or from  Scotland ..   Ranges from 18 Euros - 21 Euros a Kilo now ..   



Have a lovely summer .. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 August 2018 at 14:40
Thanks Margi.

I think trout would be great with this as it's very close to salmon. At least the trout we have here are.

As for the salmon prices, you're not too far off from here. At the current conversion rate that works out to about $10/lb. For whole salmon we pay anywhere from $6/lb (about 11.50 Euro/kilo) for farm raised Atlantic salmon up to almost $20/lb (38.25 Euro/kilo) for Alaskan Copper River salmon.  It's even more expensive for fillets or steaks. And I'm within 30 minutes of some very prime salmon runs, and it's still that expensive.
Mike
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