Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Europe > France
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - FotW's "Choucroute Day" - 29 September 2018
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

FotW's "Choucroute Day" - 29 September 2018 - Event Date: 29 September 2018

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <12
Author
Message
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8959
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 September 2018 at 10:32
Yowch!

Mike, I'm sorry to hear that. Depending on how much you lost (say, a half of beef or pork or something) and your deductible, there might be a homeowner's claim in there for you, if it was a significant loss.

If you need to put it off for a week in order to get the time and the ingredients that you want, then absolutely no worries; the only reason I am able to do it this weekend is that we just had a payday.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 5927
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 September 2018 at 16:41


Tas, 

The fermented kraut with the Fermenting Kit (www.topproducts.com) came out wonderfully .. 

The Fresh Wild  Trout shall be delivered on  Sunday mid- morning ..

The Vet had to work Saturday 29th, so we are doing our ´s  for Sunday the 30th Lunch .. 

This also gives me a chance to prepare all the cookware and servingware plus get a couple of bottles of  Alsace Riesling at the International  Supermarket, El Corte Ingles. 

I bought  the Italian Pancetta which was sliced in strips ( prefer to bacon, as it is from the Italian Da Giuseppina and much better quality for this dish ..  )  

After sauté-ing the pancetta strips,   &  draining all the Grease of course,  and then preparing the shallot saute-ing in Evoo from France,  the shallot verses onion,  I shall wrap each strip of pancetta  in the filletes of sliced trout and roll them and seal with a tiny metal skewer. 

These shall be placed on the Kraut and then with a heavy plate and a piece of parchment paper in the the lid of the Dutch Oven,  placed on low slow flame until the fish is cooked through and the Kraut is very warm ..  (  Approx.  15 - 20 mins.  )  And of course the liquid for cooking is the  Riesling .. And 1 bottle for sipping over lunch .. Or 2  !!  

I shall write up the récipe Sunday ..  

And send  a couple of fotos ..  

Have a lovely weekend ..


     

www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
www.issuu.com / Beyond Taste, Oltre il Gusto ..
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8959
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 October 2018 at 12:38
My Choucroute Day - 29 September 2018 - went pretty well; I was able to get it made, and in my opinion it tasted very good. The family seemed to enjoy it as well, so that is always a bonus.

I will try to give a detailed account here; it may ramble a bit and run over itself somewhat, but I figure that's better than missing any details. If anyone has any questions or needs any clarification, please do ask so that I can provide answers and clarify this post.

Notes on some of the ingredients:

I started with the sauerkraut that I had made exactly five weeks before from 1.5 average-sized heads of white cabbage; it spent 2 weeks fermenting in my closet, then three weeks "maturing" in the refrigerator. On the morning that I finally was ready to use it, it looked and smelled great! I tested a small bit, and found that it had a great crunch and it wasn't too salty at all, with a nice, rich sourness. It was so good as it was that I almost didn't want to rinse it out for my Choucroute, but I did anyway, trusting the recipes that I was using.

Another key ingredient in my Choucroute was a small rack of loin back pork ribs that I had purchased a day or two before; following Jacques Pépin's instructions on the main Choucroute thread, I made a petit salé of the ribs the night before preparing the Choucroute. Using this technique added a nice touch to the meal, in my opinion.

I had planned on using some of my home-cured-and-smoked Black Forest Bacon for this project; unfortunately, it "mysteriously disappeared," as so many of my specialty products or ingredients seem to do in a house full of kids. No matter; I went instead with the thickest-sliced, best-quality bacon that I could find in in our small-town grocery.

The "recipe" and method that I used to make this was a sort of an amalgam of the reading that I had done on this thread; it's probably not a true, authentic way to do it, but results were really nice. I prepared my Choucroute in an enameled cast-iron Dutch oven smeared with duck fat, based on my home-made sauerkraut, onions and garlic; spiced with a rustic "Old-Style" mustard from Maille, black pepper, cloves, juniper berries and a bouquet garni consisting of bay leaves, thyme and parsley. The sauerkraut was "garnished" with bratwurst, smoked sausage, smoked frankfurters, thick-sliced smoked bacon, sliced smoked ham, home-cured pork back ribs and baby Dutch potatoes (3 per person). I braised the dish in a combination of roasted chicken stock and a Montana-vinted Riesling from Mission Mountain Wineries.

After smearing the sides and bottom of the Dutch oven with duck fat, the sauerkraut, sliced onions and crushed garlic cloves (I used 4) were mixed together on the bottom, with the bouquet garni buried therein and the mustard, black pepper, juniper berries and cloves (I used 4) spread around on top. I then placed the baby potatoes (3 for each person) on top of the sauerkraut in the centre of the casserole, with the bratwursts, frankfurters and sausages arranged around the potatoes. Next, I topped everything with the bacon, some ham slices and the petit salé ribs, which had been rinsed and patted dry. Finally, I added about 2.5 cups of Riesling with a tablespoon of roasted chicken base mixed in, then covered the Dutch oven and put it into a cold oven. Purely on a guess and a whim, I set the oven for 340 degrees and 2.5 hours, then left everything alone.

This guess on time and temperature turned out to be spot-on, from what I can tell. After 2.5 hours, I removed the Dutch oven from the oven and let it rest for 10 minutes or so; when I took the cover off, this is what I saw (please forgive the bad lighting):



The aroma coming up from the Dutch oven was wonderful! I have made bastardized versions of this before, but this was the first time I've consciously set out to emulate a true Alsatian Choucroute. Seeing and smelling the results, I was very pleased; all that remained was to taste it.

The butler was polishing the china and the silver that day, so we had to make do with plastic:



Note: this photo is only to show the different meats involved; once I got it all on the plate, I realized it was simply too much, and cut all of the meats in half. I also added more sauerkraut to each plate, because it was really smelling nice; even my youngest son, who is no fan of store-bought sauerkraut, wanted more than I had originally plated, based solely on the aroma that was wafting up from my home-made sauerkraut in the casserole.

Where the meats were concerned, my idea was to go with a "per person" guess on portions (there were 4 of us eating): 1 bratwurst, 2 slices of bacon, 1 ham slice, 1 section of ribs, 1 frankfurter etc. It was a good idea, but for the sheer volume of food involved, I should have halved my expectations. Ironically, the amount of meat that I did use seemed to be just about right for the amount of sauerkraut that I had; in the final analysis, I simply should have invited 4 or six more people to dinner, and everything would have been perfect, I think. No worries - now we have plenty of leftovers for the coming week!

I truly liked this, and so did the family. Everything went together very well with seasonings, the Riesling and the smoke flavor from the meats. It was a huge meal, but very good. The sauerkraut itself - for me - was probably the best part - full of a whole array of flavours from the entire list of ingredients; however, the home-cured ribs, using Pépin's method, were very good, too, and a personal victory for me, as I had never attempted a true petit salé before. The rest of the meats and potatoes were all done very well; the bacon, which I had placed above the sausages, was not soggy, and the ribs were tender and juicy. The only thing that I might do differently next time would be to layer the ham slices below the bacon, rather than above, so that the renderings from the bacon can keep the ham a bit more moist.

I know that at least two other forum members - possibly more - were going to give this project a try; I eagerly await their results, and hope that this experience inspires more people to consider it for the future. You don't have to wait until next year's Choucroute Day - this is a perfect dish to prepare as we head into fall!

Ron
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <12
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.066 seconds.