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Pickled bell peppers filled with slaw

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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    Posted: 01 November 2011 at 08:39
This intriguing Balkan specialty was sent to me by our own CARMENUKA, with this note:
 
Quote you may need to adjust some food terms:)

Pickled bell peppers filled with slaw
 
- 5-6 kg. bell peppers (yellow and red)
- 4 cabbages to slaw
- black pepper
- 3 horse radish
- carrot roundly chopped
- 150 g. salt
- 4-5 liters of water
- a few cherry tree leaves
- celery leaves
 
Preparation:

- Take 4 cabbages and slaw them; take non-finely ground salt and rub it against the slaw. Let it rest a bit until the slaw is a bit soggy.
 
- Take the bell peppers and clean them inside and out, and remove the tailed end or the cap. Stuff them well with the slaw.
 
- Now it's time for the water to boil. In a large pot put the water with plenty of salt and pepper - (to know how much water you'll need take half the size/volume of the jar/pot (e.g. if you'll use a 800 grams jar you'll need about 400ml water)
 
- While the water starts boiling, you take the jar(s) and fill them with the stuffed bell peppers + chopped horse radish + chopped carrots. On top of everything, just at the mouth of the jar, you put the cherry and celery leaves and then pour the very hot pickling water. When you're finished you have to air-tightly close the jar with the cap/cover.
 
- Do not open the jar(s) even if in the first few days the water might unsettle, go stew or make some noises...
 
- The pickled peppers will be ready to serve in about 3 weeks and can be kept in a cool, dark cellar for another 6 months.

Bon apetit!:)

Carmen
 
She also sent a really beautiful picture, which i think captures the colorful spirit of this recipe and also romanian living in general ~
 
 
If anyone tries this, you might need to do some conversions from metric to standard measurements; but it seems that the directions are clear and easy to follow. Cherry leaves might be a little hard to come by in some areas, so if anyone can find out a possible substitute, be sure to let us know ~
 
Thanks for sharing this wonderful recipe, Carmen! Tongue


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Melissa Mead View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 November 2011 at 07:43
I didn't even know cherry leaves were edible!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rod Franklin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 November 2011 at 16:12
I would make this, but I might modify the procedure.

Cherry leaves are used to make the pickles crisper. They have tannins in them. So do oak leaves, grape leaves and many others.

Some cherry leaves can be mildly poisonous, but I don't think enough to be concerned about. They aren't eaten.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 November 2011 at 09:59
hey, rod - i figured this one might catch your interest ~ Clap

the procedure given is of course the "old school" way of doing it. as i recall from your outstanding sauerkraut tuorial, there are a lot of things a person can do to minimize pitfalls in the final product. i imagine many of those same methods coule be employed here, if you want to give this a try.

as for the cherry leaves - we don't have any available here, but carmen offered to send me some from her home country if i want to try this, using them. if anyone wants to try this and needs cherry leaves, let me know and we can arrange a box to send to her with a few goodies in order to trade for some!Star
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 November 2011 at 15:28
Would cherry or grape leaves "crisp up" store-bought pickles? The ones I just got are kinda mushy.

(I wonder if there's a way to use the tannins in a tea bag without making your pickles taste like tea?)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rod Franklin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 November 2011 at 15:54
I don't believe there is anything that will make a mushy pickle crisp again. I'm not convinced the tannin thing really has any effect on crispness. Leaves do impart an element of flavor though.   
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2017 at 15:05
Due to the recent interest in lacto-fermentation, I thought I'd bring this up to the top....
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2017 at 19:23
Interesting thread.

Back in colonial days, similarly stuffed and pickled peppers were very common. These were called "mangoes," for some reason.

To this day there are places in the U.S. where small peppers are called mangoes.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 May 2017 at 08:45
Hi, Brook -

This is something I would definitely like to try. I'm not a fan of green bell peppers, but if I can get my hands on some of those Hungarian-type, horned shaped red and/or yellow peppers, I think that they'd really be good with this.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 May 2017 at 10:17
wow. Thanks for bumping this Ron. I definitely would like to try this one. I wonder if you could substitute pickle crisp for the cherry leaves? Wouldn't have the same flavor, but might help with the crunch factor.

My previous house had two huge cherry trees in the back yard, but alas that's just a memory now. I do have a small fig tree, I wonder if a fig leaf would substitute?
Mike
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 May 2017 at 10:26
Mike - I'm guessing that the cherry leaves are not "critical" to this. There are probably good substitutes, including oak, grape and others. Not sure which, but it looks to the tannins in the leaves that would be important.

Pickle crisp could work - I just don't know....

Brook?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 May 2017 at 11:04
Bay leaves, perhaps?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 May 2017 at 14:05

Ron,

Firstly, this is very common in the Transylvania Pass Route of Brasov / Poina.  There is a place that I had lunch at, where they sell uncountable  types of jarred peppers with cabbage and other  vegetables. It was amazing !   

Secondly, the pointy Peppers, Ron, Italian would work and they are " pointy horn shaped " ..  And fairly easy to come by in the USA  ..  as well as the Piquillos, the Basque red peppers, which are pointy.

Good luck.  Fabulous project.

And Brook:   Yes,  before the years of electricity,  many pioneers and settlers, jarred their vegetables and fruits ..  Interesting .. 

Have a lovely weekend Gentlemen.






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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 May 2017 at 19:22
Margi: I'm talking long before those days. "Modern" preservation methods, particularly what they call jarring in England and canning in the U.S. dates only from 1812. Napoleon had offered a cash prize for anyone who could devise a method of preserving food for troops in the field.

The mangoes I refer to above would have been put up in barrels. The most popular variety for making them was a pepper called Bullnose.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 May 2017 at 15:11


Brook,

PRESERVING VEGETABLES, CUCUMBERS, PEPPERS & CARROTS, BEETROOT, EGGPLANT: 

Due to the long cold Eastern European winters,  The Brasovian Region of north eastern Romania, located  on The  Transylvania Passage, during 1377,   travellers, with a lack of vegetables  due to harsh blizzards and snows,  had also found means to store their vegetables as all cultures and indigenious peoples did and still do ..  The Romanians were occupied by the Romans, who produced glass jars.

NOTE:   Glass jars were produced in Southeast Asia, in 100 B.C.  and by the Romans in the year 1 A.D. 

North America:  Jamestown, Virginia in the 1600s --  Jars were manufactured ..

Then,  why so many years later, 1812, which is much later than the other cultures development in this sector.

The Koreans have been fernenting since time memorial ..   The Romanians,  The Russians,  The Hungarians and the Turks &  The Bulgarians, The Indians have been preserving cucumbers and vegetables for  4,000 years in Jars ..



Interesting historian facts on these peppers.  

 

Shall check out these peppers you have mentioned  and see how what I can find on topic .. 


Have a nice weekend.




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